PDA

View Full Version : History of Swede-Finn? Finlandssvenskar (Partly in English & Swedish/tvåspråkig tråd)



kpaavola
10-09-03, 16:48
Prior to being introduced to the Finlander List, I would have defined a Swede-Finn as having one parent Swedish and the other parent Finnish. Ignorant, I know.

I've read some discussions on the subject and know it can be a rather intense subject and my desire is not to stir the pot. I'm curious to know the origin of what is referred to as "Swede-Finn".

Where I live, in Orlando, we've had an influx of Hispanic people over the years. It has gotten to the point that announcements in stores are made in Spanish, signs appear in Spanish, billboards on the roadside are beginning to appear in Spanish, etc. It seems that the Hispanic culture is "pouring over" into the American culture.

Is this similar to how it was in Finland? I know Finland was ruled by Sweden in the past. Was the beginning of Swede-Finn due to Swedish immigrants who settled in Finland and simply held dear to their culture and language?

My father's ancestors were from Vaasa while my mother's ancestors were from Oulu. My father always attributed the difference in their spoken Finnish to the fact that my mother's family was from an area closer to Sweden and thus had a Swedish influence. Not sure there's any truth to that but their Finn was slightly different.

Last question...I'm assuming there really is no way to know from researching Finnish ancestors which language they may have spoken at home. Is this correct?

Trying to understand better....:confused:

June Pelo
10-09-03, 17:39
Kevin,

In the Caino-Torp book Prof. Pentti Virrankoski has an article "The Main Outline of the Earlier Settlement of Ostrobothnia" which may help to answer your question. Also, I have posted a number of articles on the Net which may give some background. Here is "Swedish Speaking Ostrobothnia" I have another, "The Finns Who Speak Swedish" which I can send to anyone interested.

For anyone who doesn't have a copy of the Caino-Torp book, I can send Prof. Virrankoski's article, which I translated to English for him. It's about 5 pages.

June

kpaavola
10-09-03, 18:09
This statement from the document seems to make it a bit clearer:

A natural consequent of Finland's historical connection to Sweden, the economic, cultural and political elite in Finland was predominantly of Swedish nobility, clergy and upper class.

It seems to me if Swedish speakers held positions of power, that might explain how "their" language survived. In my mind, especially the clergy. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I'll check out your other articles and Caino-Torp when I get home this evening.

kpaavola
10-09-03, 18:11
It just dawned on me the contrast between this subject and what I see in Orlando/Florida. Here, it seems, the language/culture is surviving due to the volume of immigrants. Curious!! :)

staffan
10-09-03, 18:53
Hi Kevin,

Your original questions need longer answers but I can offer a short answer to your last one:


Originally posted by kpaavola

Last question...I'm assuming there really is no way to know from researching Finnish ancestors which language they may have spoken at home. Is this correct?


It is for instance possible to find out which language was the mother tongue by studying the column "Modersmål. Äidinkieli." in the communion books.

Hasse
10-09-03, 20:36
It seems to me if Swedish speakers held positions of power, that might explain how "their" language survived. In my mind, especially the clergy. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Kevin,

Swedish was and is spoken by all "layers" in the society, from peasants to ministers etc.. The Swedish speaking population dates back to at least the 1200's - ie. pre-historic time. When the ancestors settled in the current Swedish speaking areas and if they started to farm virgin soil is thus hard to get exact data of.

Since the administration was underlying Sweden until 1809 of course the Swedish language was the main language of the administration. Those days weren't that democratic and as the area of current Finland underlie Sweden the Swedes decided the ways and language of the administration.

In older times one can see that also other languages were present among the "leaders", we can for example find many Danish, Scottish, German "immigrants" making way into the administration in Finland.

People often forget that also "ordinary" people spoke Swedish and connect Swedish speakers automatically to the persons "holding the power".

Finally I would argue that the Swedish language has survived in Finland because of the people on the "grass root" -level and inspite of activities during the era 1870-1930 when there was a movement to fennicify the Swedish speaking population.

As an comparison - in Estonia the Swedish population was of the same magnitude in the 1500-1700, see article (http://www.einst.ee/factsheets/swedes/) . Here the Soviet invasion succeeded in wiping out almost all of the Swedish speakers.

kpaavola
11-09-03, 00:31
Thanks, Hasse, for shedding some more light on this subject.

Thanks, also Staffan. I've never noticed that column before. I'll go back and check some of my rippikirjat copies and see if there's any notation. I'm really curious about this aspect. :)

sune
22-09-03, 21:53
If I may I would like to confuse you a bit more about the mother tongue issue.

What is marked in the column for "modersmål" or "äidinkieli" is not nessesarily entirely the whole truth. It reflects what the person, or his or her parents wanted him or her to be, which is'nt always what the person was or is.

There was a period in Finland from the late 19th century to about 1940, when it was a strong trend to change Swedish names into Finnish. People who were born Swedish decided that they wanted to be Finns together with their children. This often divided families. For instance some of J. V. Snellman's descendants translated there family name into Virkkunen. Forsman could change into Koskinen, Örnberg became Kotkavuori and so on.

The fact is that there are virtually no genetical differencies between Swedes and Finns in Finland. There are some cultural differences, but they are unnoticable to the untrained eye.

Then we have the mixed marriages, which are becoming more and more common these days. They cloud the language issue even more.

For example: My grandmother on my mothers side was born in Toholampi and spoke only Finnish when she moved to Jakobstad as a young girl and became a maid with the Schaumann family. She learned Swedish and married a Swedish Finn. For the rest of her life she considerd her self a Swede. In fact she wasn't biliungual. She was semilingual, that is, she spoke both languages equally badly.

My point is that the "mother tongue" in Finland is and were often a case of (political or social) choice, not necessarily of birth.

Best Regards
Sune

arnold carlson
25-09-03, 16:35
The western shore of Finland from the area of Vaasa south to Helsinki were particularly Swedish speaking Finns. My father was from the Åland Islands and this is now a non military protectorate of Finland but they are all Swedish speaking. This by an act of the Geneva Convention about 1920.

Arnold Carlson, Venice, FL

Gita Wiklund
09-10-03, 23:57
Sune,

I´ve often wondered about the familyname Ruotsalainen. Doesn´t it translate to "from Sweden" or "Swedish"? Could that mean that those who have that familyname originally are swedish finns?

Gita

sune
10-10-03, 14:59
Hi Gita

You are quite right in your assumption. Ruotsalainen translates as Swedish. So, it is possible that the original Ruotsalainen was a Swede, not neccessarily a Swedish Finn. He could be an immigrant from Sweden as well. We must remember that the construction Swedish Finn is new in history. J. L. Runeberg (1803-1877) called himself a Finn.

The first Swedes came to Finland from the eastern part of Sweden. For instance from the Roslagen achipelago. I am not an etymologist, but I believe that the word Ruotsi (Sweden) originally means Roslagen. It has in other words the same origin as the word Russia (Ryssland in Swedish). The first rulers of Russia were vikings from Roslagen.

(Russia is Venäjä in Finnish, which comes from a vestern part of Russia called Viena, and Estonia is called Viro in Finnish, because the part of Estonia which is nearest to Finland is called Virumaa. Germany is Saksa in Finnish, because there must have been early contacts between Finland av Sachsen in Germany)

There is by the way a lake in the middle of Filand called Ruotsalainen. I is situated near Heinola a short distance north of Lahtis. That area has never been dominated by Swedes. Maybe a Swede has drowned there or somethign like that, I do not know.

yours
Sune

Gita Wiklund
10-10-03, 19:24
Sune,
I think this is very interesting. Thank you.
In my family we have always considered us being swedish finns. I started my search for anscestors because I felt I knew too little about our history. My parents didn´t know so much either concerning the swede finn history. I wanted to know when "we" came to Finland if possible and from where. So far I´m down to the early 18th cent. om my fathers side, still in Finland and to the early 16th century on my mothers also still in Finland. But the tounge spoken seems to be swedish.

Gita

Henrik.Mangs
10-10-03, 22:24
Originally posted by Gita Wiklund
Sune,
I think this is very interesting. Thank you.
In my family we have always considered us being swedish finns...

Svensktalande i Finland.
Kom i håg att Finland som nation är en ny företeelse sen 1918 och att före det var Finland en del av Sverige till 1808-09 års krig. Österbotten och Västerbotten hade periodvis gemensam administration i Korsholm. Vi skall komma i håg att Finland som benämning på denna tid fanns i form av Egentliga Finland "Varsinais Suomi".

MVH
Henrik

Gita Wiklund
11-10-03, 12:40
Hej Henrik,

Jo, jag vet detta. Men mycket av det här visste jag inte innan jag började släktforska. Släktforskningen ledde mig på ett naturligt sätt till historieböckerna. Rätta mig om jag tänker fel, men de som är svenskspråkiga har väl ändå troligtvis en härstamning som kan härledas till den västra sidan av Östersjön? Även om det så skulle vara så långt tillbaka som 1200-talet.
Visst finns det de som har annan språklig bakgrund som har övergått till svenska av praktiska skäl, exempelvis handelsmän. Så kan det vara på min fars sida, men jag tvivlar på att det är så på min mors, en bondesläkt från Kyrkslätt. Men visst kan jag ha fel. Troligtvis är det svårt att leda något i bevis på den punkten. Men det kan ju finnas anteckningar om modersmål i kyrkböcker som jag ännu inte har haft tillfälle att undersöka. Sannolikt finns det en och annan anmoder med finskspråkig bakgrund iallafall. Berätta gärna mer, om du menar att jag har missuppfattat något.

Vänligen,
Gita

Gunnel
11-10-03, 14:48
Hej Gita och andra!

Såg den här diskussionen, och kunde inte låta bli att sticka sleven i soppan. Det är ganska knepigt det här med rötterna. Tar mig själv som ett exempel:

Om vi går tillbaka till 1698 föddes en anmoder till mig, Sofia Gabrielsdotter Springman, vars far troligen kom från Sverige. Hon gifte in sig i Wirmaila-släkten i Finland, och min mormor som då föddes i en helt finsk trakt (Jämsä år 1888) var också helt finskspråkig då hon som ung flicka kom till det svensktalande Esbo. Här träffade hon sin blivande man, vars släkt varit svenskspråkig sedan "urminnestider" (Esbo, Kyrkslätt, Sjundeå).

Mormor lärde sig snabbt svenska, och min mamma blev helt svensspråkig då familjen bodde hela sitt liv i Esbo. Ja, tro det eller ej, men mamma lärde sig aldrig finska ordentligt. :-)

Min pappa är född i Helsingfors av ryska/baltiska/polska föräldrar! Tack vare att hans föräldrar kom just till Helsingfors, gjorde väl att de blev s.k. svenskspråkiga. I Helsingfors torde de flesta emigranter ha talat svenska på den tiden. Om pappa kände sig som svensk eller rysk fick jag aldrig veta, och nu är det för sent att fråga.

Och nu undrar ni vad jag känner mig som?! På den frågan kan jag inte ännu svara :-)

Gunnel

Gita Wiklund
11-10-03, 17:10
Hej Gunnel och andra intresserade,

Det var verkligen intressant Gunnel! Det är ett bra exempel på hur det kan vara. Själv tycker jag att det inte spelar någon roll om jag skulle vara svensk, rysk, tysk eller finsk etc till mitt genetiska eller kulturella/ sociala ursprung. Men det blir spännande att se vad som kommer fram när jag gräver längre bakåt (förutsatt att jag kommer längre bakåt, vilket jag hoppas)

Hälsningar,
Gita

syrene
12-10-03, 00:03
Hi Listers,
Or Forumers, if you will:)
During a visit to Finland (perhaps 8 years ago or more) someone stated that the Solf Hembygdsförening wrote to Umeå university for help in ascertaining how long ago the ridges of Solf had held human dwellings. Cores samples were made and analyzed for plant residues, and it was stated that rye had been farmed there for around 2000 years! Whatever that implies in terms of what language the farmers spoke, I don't know.

However, when you consider the "folkvandring" pathway northward, it seems likely that groups of the same sorts of tribes that hit Gotland and Öland would have moved through some parts of southern and coastal Finland. If during that period Finland escaped notice, surely the Vikings, thousands of years later, had set up camps and supply systems for their trading journeys into what we call Russia?

Wish I had been a mouse in the woodpile watching this centuries ago!
Syrene

Henrik.Mangs
12-10-03, 15:46
Originally posted by Gunnel
Hej Gita och andra!

Såg den här diskussionen, och kunde inte låta bli att sticka sleven i soppan. Det är ganska knepigt det här med rötterna. Tar mig själv som ett exempel:
...
Och nu undrar ni vad jag känner mig som?! På den frågan kan jag inte ännu svara :-)


Hej.
När man kommer in på modersmål och språkbruk kommer man in på en mångfassetterad palett. Ta till exempel Korsnäs kommun som är den kommun i värden som har mest svenskpråkiga invånare. Går man för deras del bakåt till 1700-talet var det otroligt många nybyggare från finska österbotten. Dessa bröt mark med hacka spade och spätt. Anpassade sig snabbt till den omgivande miljön och deras ättlingar blev svenskspråkiga trots modersmålet var finska. Det finnes också svenskspråkiga som kommit till österbotten via Estland. Exempel på en sådan släkt är Hasselblatt.
MVH
Henrik Mangs

Gita Wiklund
12-10-03, 16:03
Ja, då är det väl bara att konstatera att begreppet finlandssvensk
borde strykas ur vokabulären och ersättas med kanske finländare med X modersmål, eller varför inte fadersmål eller familjemål

Vilken intressant diskussion det här blev!

Gita:)

Henrik.Mangs
12-10-03, 16:15
Hej.

Ja det intressantamed denna diskussionen är ju att den verkliga bakgrunden kan vara en helt annan än man tänkt sig.
Ju mer man lärt sig om språk och språktillhörigheter ur lite tidsperspektiv har i varje fall jag svårt att förstå den iver som fanns i Finland på 20- och 30-talen att med milt våld övergå till finskan och till varje pris hitta en mer eller mindre lyckad förfinskning av efternamn. Jag har träffat på några yngre personer som i dag är berädda att återuppta det gamla efternamnet.
MVH
Henrik Mangs

Gita Wiklund
12-10-03, 16:57
Ju mer man lärt sig om språk och språktillhörigheter ur lite tidsperspektiv har i varje fall jag svårt att förstå den iver som fanns i Finland på 20- och 30-talen att med milt våld övergå till finskan och till varje pris hitta en mer eller mindre lyckad förfinskning av efternamn

Henrik, Du som verkar vara insatt i detta ämne. Hur resonerade ivrarna?
Och de som bytte sina efternamn, menade de att de traditionellt sett varit mer finskspråkiga och mer eller mindre tvingats att använda svenska namn och svenskt språk? Ursäkta min okunnighet, jag känner ju till språkstriderna men jag har inte hunnit fördjupa mig i detta intressanta ämne. Jag är mycket intresserad.

Gita

Gunnel
12-10-03, 17:00
Originally posted by Henrik.Mangs
Hej.

....... har i varje fall jag svårt att förstå den iver som fanns i Finland på 20- och 30-talen att med milt våld övergå till finskan och till varje pris hitta en mer eller mindre lyckad förfinskning av efternamn. Jag har träffat på några yngre personer som i dag är berädda att återuppta det gamla efternamnet.
MVH
Henrik Mangs


Ja, det var tokigt, men vad anser ni: var det rätt eller orätt av min far att byta ut sitt ryska släktnamn till ett mera neutralt år 1944?
P.g.a. "vissa omständigheter" kan man ju förstå det; det var inte så populärt med "ryssar" på den tiden...

År 1998 antog jag själv min pappas mors flicknamn (Marus). Det fanns en hel del att välja emellan...:-))

En annan fråga som jag undrar över är hur det kommer sig att min far deltog både i vinter- och fortsättningskriget, fastän han erhöll sitt finska medborgarskap först 1944? Har kollat på krigsarkivet, men där finns endast det s.k. stamkortet tillgängligt.

Hälsn.
Gunnel:confused:

Henrik.Mangs
12-10-03, 17:18
Originally posted by Gita Wiklund
Henrik, Du som verkar vara insatt i detta ämne. Hur resonerade ivrarna?...

Hej.

Jag tror att du i viss mån berörde pudelns kärna. Jag vet inte vad som motiverade folk att undertycka sitt hemspråk och förneka sitt ursprung genom att använda ett majoritetsspråk och ytterligare dölja sitt ursprung genom namnbyte
MVH
Henrik Mangs

syrene
12-10-03, 18:13
Hej!
Ursökta mitt svenska, tack!
Dons kusin i Esbo var förvånad att höra hur en annan kusins finlandsvensk familj hade bytt namn. Jag kommer inte ihåg vad deras svenska namn hade varit. Men för två generationer hade de bakat bröd och sålt det i Helsingfors' förort. Så de tyckte det skulle vara passande att bygga ett nytt namn utav "bröd" men på Finska. De tog "Leipinen". Esbobon skrattade när han hörde och sedan förklarade att Leipinen betydde BLAAAH, dvs ingenting på finska. Undrar om han hade rätt. Undrar också om det finns flera sådana namn som igentligen betyder ingenting, men togs för att de lät finskt?
mvh
Syrene

Henrik.Mangs
12-10-03, 18:40
Originally posted by syrene
Dons kusin i Esbo var förvånad att höra hur en annan kusins finlandsvensk familj hade bytt namn. ...
Undrar också om det finns flera sådana namn som igentligen betyder ingenting, men togs för att de lät finskt?

Hej.
Inget fel på din svenska. Och kom ihåg att friskt vågat är hälften vunnet.
Ja ditt exempel är väl ett utmärkt exempel på marknadsanpassning utan eftertanke.
Studerar man denna grupp av efternamn som förfinskades på 20- och 30-talet kan man finna flera banala och omotiverade översättningar alldeles som du beskriver.
MVH
Henrik Mangs

Gita Wiklund
12-10-03, 18:56
Människor verkar i allmänhet gärna flyta med på den "vinnande" eller härskande sidan. Kanske tycker de att det underlättar deras liv. Själv tenderar jag att inte se mig så mycket omkring och följa strömmen utan lyssna inåt och göra därefter. Jag skulle aldrig kunna byta mitt namn och språk på det sättet.

Men den finskspråkiga andelen invånare har väl ändå dominerat inom det som nu är Finland. Med tanken på ett självständigt Finland är det nog inte så konstigt att tanken på finskan som nationens huvudspråk infinner sig. Ett språk som aldrigt tillmätts större betydelse under andra härskarmakter. Kanske är det en berusning vid tanken på en egen nation med ett eget språk som är förklaringen?

Sen kan man väl också se att det finns spänningar där olika språkgrupper finns sida vid sida, och att den allmänmänskliga interaktionen och samhällsservicen underlättas av att ett gemensamt språk används. Men det är egentligen upp till var och en hur långt man vill gå anser jag. Som sagt, mitt svenska språk som jag fick av mina föräldrar är viktigt för mig för det är starkt förknippat med mitt känsloliv. Vår historia berättas i detta språk, och hur skulle jag ha kunnat läsa min farfars fars skrifter om mina föräldrar, eller deras föräldrar, hade bestämt sig för att vi bara skulle tala finska såsom medborgare i Finland?

Min syster får snart sitt första barn. Hon är gift med en man i ett annat land och bosatt där. Hon vill att barnet ska bli tvåspråkigt, och jag är glad över hennes beslut. Jag skickar henne en sångbok, så att hon för barnet kan sjunga de sånger som mödrar i flera generationer har sjungit för sina barn i min släkt.

Jag känner också en stor förståelse för de invandrare från sydliga länder som kommer till Sverige och Finland och värnar om sina hemspråk. Samtidigt dömer jag inte ut dem som vill smälta in i sitt nya hemland och väljer att byta namn och talar det nya språket med barnen. Det är ett ställningstagande var och en får göra, och båda synsätten har sina för- och nackdelar. Det viktiga är att man inte känner att man ger upp sig själv.

Gita

Henrik.Mangs
12-10-03, 19:15
Originally posted by Gita Wiklund
Människor verkar i allmänhet gärna flyta med på den "vinnande" eller härskande sidan. ...

Hej igen.

Tack för ditt inlägg, tänk om många av de som gjort dessa bytesval verkligen hade tänkt efter lite mer än att bara följa med trender. Då kanske många mindre goda val ha undvikits. Än en gång tack Gita för ditt inlägg.
MVH
Henrik Mangs

Hasse
12-10-03, 19:31
Henrik,

Att folk bytte namn är känt, men vet du om det finns undersökt hur utbrett bytet var bland "bygde-" respektive "kultursvenskar". Jag förstår att finskhetsivern fick många som hade finska som hemspråk att byta sitt namn, men om man tänker på de familjer som hade svenska som hemspråk eller hade två språk - hur vanligt var det månne att "följa med strömmen"? Var det omgivningen - om man levde i Ylivieska som Cajanus kanske det inte lät så bra och det var enklare att byta till ett finskklingande och smälta in. Hemma kunde man prata vad som helst.

enges
12-10-03, 19:38
För att förstå finskhetsivern måste man se tillbaka till den ryska tiden. På 1800-talets mitt började fennomanrörelsen som en intellektuell rörelse. Sverige hade ju "slarvat bort" Finland till ryssarna i 1808-9 års krig, så finländarna hade problem med den nationella identiteten. De var ju inte längre svenskar och ville inte bli ryssar, så då fanns det bara ett alternativ till - finnar. "Svenskar äro vi icke mera, ryssar kunna vi icke bli, derför måste vi vara finnar" är en slogan tillskriven Adolf Ivar Arwidsson.

Det var på den tiden inte så mycket en fråga om språk utan om nationell identitet. De ledande fennomanerna på den tiden var oftast svenskspråkiga. Denna rörelse tog sedan ny fart efter självständigheten. På den tiden var det inte frågan om den "språkhets" som uppkommit under efterkrigsåren, utan även om en person bytte bort sitt svenska (eller ryska) namn till ett finskt betydde detta inte att de för den skull slutade prata svenska - finskhet var mer en nationalromantisk rörelse än en språkrörelse. Det finska namnet gav dem (troligen) en större känsla av nationell samhörighet.

Det finns dock rätt många missförstånd om namnbyten. T.ex. så bytte aldrig författaren Alexander Stenvall namn till Aleksis Kivi - det var bara hans författarpseudonym när han skrev.

Jag har en morfar som bytte namn på 30-talet. Han var oäkta son till en kvinna som hade varit gift Eriksson. Hennes man hade dock rymt till Amerika, utan att någonsin höra av sig igen. För morfar hade efternamnet Eriksson ingen histora eller värde. Det var inte hans namn. Därför bytte han namn till Eirasuo för att skapa sin egen histora. Han var dock hela livet helt tvåspråkig och förnekade aldrig sin tvåspråkiga bakgrund (hans mor var ursprungligen finskspråkig).

Jag kan delvis förstå att de som inte hade "riktiga" efternamn, utan bara namn de godtyckligt fått av en präst, ville byta namn till ett "eget" efternamn. Lite svårare har jag dock med de som bytte bort ett "historiskt" namn med rötter i bygden. Jag har även lite svårt för de som fortfarande har sina "svenska" namn, men inte ens kan uttala namnet korrekt...

/anders

Gita Wiklund
12-10-03, 19:46
Det var på den tiden inte så mycket en fråga om språk utan om nationell identitet

Det är precis det intrycket jag har fått.

Gita

Gunnar Damström
12-10-03, 21:11
Det är intressant att utsträcka analysen till ett vidare europeiskt perspektiv. Nationalromantiken florerade i medlet av 1800-talet, inte bara i Finland. Dess främsta förespråkare Hegel hävdade att individen får sitt värde endast som en medlem i en nation. Bifogar en artikel om J.V.Snellman skriven av professor Matti Klinge som på ett förtjänstfullt sätt beskriver den nationalromantiska rörelsen i Finland under vars inflytnade talrika finlandsvenskar "bytte nationalitet". En av dem var Joahn Gustaf Hellsten, eller som han föredrag att kallas, Juho Kusit Paasikivi.
Trevlig söndagsläsning,

It is interesting to extend the analyses to a wider European perspective. The national romantic movement was flourishing in the mid 1800s, not only in Finland. Its formost advocate Hegel claimed that the individual gets its value only as a member of a nation. The attached article about J.V.Snellman, written by professor Matti Klinge describes the national romantic currents in Finland under the influence of which numerous Swedish Finns "switched nationality". One of them was Johan Gustaf Hellsten, or as he preferred to be called Juho Kusit Paasikivi (senator, banker, ambassador, two term Finnish president)
For your Sunday reading pleasure,
Gunnar Damström

Gita Wiklund
12-10-03, 22:19
Tack Gunnar för att du bifogade artikeln!

Gita

Henrik.Mangs
13-10-03, 04:40
Originally posted by Hasse
Henrik,

Att folk bytte namn är känt, men vet du om det finns undersökt hur utbrett bytet var bland "bygde-" respektive "kultursvenskar". Jag förstår att finskhetsivern fick många som hade finska som hemspråk att byta sitt namn, men om man tänker på de familjer som hade svenska som hemspråk eller hade två språk - hur vanligt var det månne att "följa med strömmen"? Var det omgivningen - om man levde i Ylivieska som Cajanus kanske det inte lät så bra och det var enklare att byta till ett finskklingande och smälta in. Hemma kunde man prata vad som helst.

Hej.

Jag tror att det var många som hade de bevekelsegrunder som du för fram. Men då fanns det också några starka personligheter som med hjälp av stämningarna i samhellet utnytjade ett namnbyte till sin kariärframgång. Dessa hade ju en sto fördel gentemot sin omgivning, då de hade tillgång till två kulturer.
MVH
Henrik Mangs

Heather
26-10-03, 02:37
You mentioned not knowing what language an ancestor's first language was......

I found in the US federal census for PA,USA 1930 that Anna Sten's (my husband's ggrandmother from Finland) first language was Swedish.