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diogenes99
04-12-06, 16:50
http://www.ftdna.com/surname_join.asp?code=P91273&special=true

There is already a Finland Y DNA project at FTDNA.

Current coordinator (from website):

Lauri Koskinen
Tammitie 6
43100 SAARIJÄRVI
Puh. (014) 423 887

diogenes99
05-12-06, 06:16
Lauri Koskinen contacted me today and has made me co-administrator of the Finland Geographical Y-DNA project at FTDNA. It will be after Christmas before I can think through what I will propose to Lauri Koskinen.

Here is the project website:

www.familytreedna.com/public/Finland

wcscott
08-12-06, 07:25
Michael,
I would like to join the Finland-Y DNA project when you get going on it. I'm currently the admin for the Saline project at FTDNA but we've pretty well 'flattened out' on membership advances. Actually the project was formed by me to evaluate a family I felt certain was my immediate family but turned out to be rather distant ancestry-wise .. maybe 400-500 yrs ago, is what I now believe to be the distance. We still might be closer...time will tell.
Anyway, the Saline family immigrated from Finland around 1840 or so and came from just south of Oulu. Their original Finnish name is Savilaakso and prior to that, Saarala. One of the cousins filled me in on some of their history and name changing when the family moved from one farm to another in Finland.
As I'm still trying to pin down my grandfather, he might well be a branch off their family .. our Y-DNA at 37 markers is off by a distance of 8 but was 24/25 at that level and all our differences are on "fast-moving" markers.
Be joining up later...cya

Chris scott
Coalgate, Ok, uSA

diogenes99
08-12-06, 16:42
Lauri, the founder of the project, is out of country until late December. At that point we'll plan an advertising strategy and write something in Finnish, Swedish, and English (maybe more languages) that will explain the project.

I'd like to write an article and publish it in some papers around Finland, the USA, and perhaps other countries with Finnish concentrations.

The biggest thing people can help us with is finding those publications (such as the Finnish American Reporter) that will publish a short piece on the project so that we can attract a large project population.

June Pelo
08-12-06, 17:54
Michael,

Have you contacted Jim Kurtti, editor of FAR? He's always looking for articles of interest for the paper.

editor*finnishamericanreporter.com

June

Nicholas
11-12-06, 16:42
Michael,

I would also be interested in joining this project. I am currently the admin for the Smeds project at FT DNA, but we are now down to a small group that I am coaxing to take the test.

My Smeds family came to the USA from Närpes, Finland, around 1902, and went on to southern Colorado, where there were many Swedish-speaking Finns at the time.

Don't know for certain, but I believe that there are several old towns in SW Colorado--such as Telluride-- that were originally founded by Finns. I have been told that most of those towns were mining camps that became towns. If you are looking for places to advertise, SW Colorado might be a good area.

My haplogroup is N (probably N3, though I am still waiting for the results of a SNP test).

Let me know when sign-up is operational for the Finland Y-Group.

Thanks.

Nicholas

June Pelo
11-12-06, 22:07
FAR, Dec. 2006 has an article about Dr. Leena Peltonen, one of the leading scientists in the field of molecular genetics. She said "Finnish expertise in genetics, combined with the unique Finnish genetic structure, forms the most efficient setting when we seek to solve the mystery of the genetic risk behind many diseases."

Finland has a unique population for carrying out research on disease genes. Finland was inhabited thousands of years ago by a very limited number of settlers - Finnish Adams and Eves - and there are still only 5 million Finns living in a country the size of California or France. Peltonen said "In this setting we carry only a small selection of all global gene variants. When we add to this history the fact that the Finns are probably the best documented people for health-related data.. we do have a singular chance to characterize genetic and lifestyle risk factors critical for human diseases."

June

Jaska Sarell
12-12-06, 00:51
Odd, that professor Leena Palotie's maiden name Peltonen still appears in a recent article (married since 1981) :confused:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leena_Palotie

:) Jaska

wcscott
12-12-06, 03:00
Jaska,
Thanks a million for the link to Prof. Pelotie (Peltonnen) article. This is the first inkling Ive had that MS was one of the Finnish genetic disease heritage maladies. I have MS and a Finnish DNA profile (my first 9 markers occur in about 22% of all Finn males) according to studies done. I thought previously that all of those 'rare' diseases were much rarer than MS is...but thanks again...maybe this will open new pathways for me to explore.
Chris Scott

diogenes99
12-12-06, 20:08
I am excited about the Finland Y-DNA project because it will show where my earliest paternal-line ancestors came from. Here is a map showing the relative current mixes and migration paths.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1377088&blobtype=pdf

diogenes99
12-12-06, 20:13
Originally posted by Jaska Sarell
Odd, that professor Leena Palotie's maiden name Peltonen still appears in a recent article (married since 1981) :confused:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leena_Palotie

:) Jaska

Many professors keep their maiden names because they have established that name in the academic community.

Jaska Sarell
12-12-06, 20:56
Originally posted by diogenes99
Many professors keep their maiden names because they have established that name in the academic community.
Quite true, and indeed she is often referred with combination surname Peltonen-Palotie, as in Finnish language Wikipedia article.

:) Jaska

diogenes99
29-12-06, 02:19
The administrator has expanded the Finland DNA Geographic Project to include both maternal and paternal lines.

http://www.ftdna.com/surname_join.asp?code=P91273&special=true

Laura Hayden
29-12-06, 23:33
Originally posted by diogenes99
[B]The administrator has expanded the Finland DNA Geographic Project to include both maternal and paternal lines.

Michael, that's great news; I've signed up and will pass the word along.

If you haven't considered it already, I'd recommend making an announcement about the project to the different DNA lists (for instance, DNA, DNA-NEWBIE, DNA-ANTHROGENEALOGY). Another possibility is joining the International Society of Genetic Genealogy:

www.isogg.org

Membership is free, and you could post a notice about the Finland Geographic Project on ISOGG's "New DNA Projects" page.

Lycka till!
Laura

diogenes99
02-01-07, 09:32
Update:

27 people have joined the Finland DNA project between December 20, 2006 and January 1.

Laura is now a co-administrator for the Finnish maternal lines (mtDNA), and we have added an introductory page.

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Finland/

Claire
20-01-07, 18:41
I am very interested to read about the Finland Y DNA project.

If someone is interested in spreading the word about this project in order to gather up more participants, they might focus on Vancouver and Langley, British Columbia.

As I grew up in Langley, there were two areas there that had a Swede-Finn population. (Brown Road and Campbell River Road) I believe many of them had started their new Canadian lives in Vancouver and the surrounding areas. I knew that all my Campbell River Road group was somehow inter-related. They had come from the same area of Finland. I confirmed this on my trip to Finland in 2005. As I walked through the graveyard in Korsnas, there were headstones bearing all the surnames of the people I knew in Langley.

Perhaps our national radio, CBC, would be interested in talking up this project.

diogenes99
22-01-07, 07:45
Almost 100 members have joined the Findland DNA project!

We are seeing clusters of genetic matches all around Finland, and 6 participants have a possible common ancestor about 450 years ago near Vasa.

We have a new website: http://www.fidna.info

The project is still new, but I have already learned quite a bit! My DNA test shows that my Storkarhu-Svens forefathers (first found in Vörå) are from what is now Russia, but the migration was probably about 4000 years ago. How do they know this? As groups migrated they left descendants with the same DNA along the trail! They map this and also mark the small genetic mutations along the way which serve as a kind of genetic clock.

Before receiving the test results, I guessed that I would have a paternal line from Sweden or Western Europe. But the results show that my Storkarhu-Svens forefathers were already in Finland before the Western European wave 2000 years ago and the Swedish colonization starting 1000 years ago.

We are not ready for TV yet, but I hope people will join so that we have something to report when the time comes!

More later.... :) :)

anastom
22-01-07, 15:09
Hi Michael,

Very interesting findings already in the project.
Just wondering are dates in the statement "Western European wave 2000 years ago and the Swedish colonization starting 1000 years ago" based on DNA results ?

Regards
Tommy

June Pelo
22-01-07, 17:49
Came across this interesting URL:

http://humphrysfamilytree.com/ca.html

June

diogenes99
22-01-07, 18:45
Originally posted by anastom
Hi Michael,

Very interesting findings already in the project.
Just wondering are dates in the statement "Western European wave 2000 years ago and the Swedish colonization starting 1000 years ago" based on DNA results ?

Regards
Tommy

The wave 2000 years ago is based on Kittles's paper ( http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1377088&blobtype=pdf )

These estimates are consistent with archeological data that suggest that the first settlers were Uralic speakerswho arrived ~4,000 years ago (Fodor and Czeizel 1991) and that a later group settled along the southern shores ~2,000 years ago (Luho 1976). Partition of Y chromosome variance revealed that 10%of the total variance was found between provinces. Interestingly, ~4% of the total variance is attributed to differences between what have been termed “old Finland” and “new Finland” (de la Chapelle 1993). These values are quite high for a population traditionally viewed as a homogeneous genetic isolate. In fact, the significant genetic differences between provinces are due not only to the mixed or dual origins of Finns but also to the limited number of settlers and isolation by distance.

Tuuli Lappalainen ( http://vetinari.sitesled.com/finns.pdf ) writes, however,
The precise history or origin of the difference between the eastern and the western gene pool in Finland and the exact origin of the differences or time scales and extents of migration events into Finland await further lucidation.

The colonial wave starting 1000 years ago is documented in many places, but I don't have a handy reference right now. One large force was the crusades of around 1200. I am not sure if there is a DNA study to support the archeology yet.

What I would like to see are many more participants in our project, because that will allow us to find where people came from. Of course, my interest is in the Vasa area and Swede-Finns in general.

Also of interest is this approximate distribution of haplotypes by country. A haplotype is just a pattern found in the DNA. Mine is N3. People with I1a are more likely Swedes or Western European in ancestral origin.

Swedes:

I1a - 48%
R1b - 22%
R1a - 18%
N3 - 3%

Finns:

N3 - 63%
I1a - 29%
R1a - 8%
R1b - 0%

Russians (slavic):

R1a - 43%
R1b - 21%
I1a - 13%
N3 - 8%
N2 - 8%

Pomors ("north-russians"):

I1a - 21%
R1a - 40%
N3 - 29%
R1b - 0%

There are subtypes (subclades) to each of these haplotyoes, and as people get more detailed testing is will be easier to find their deep ancestral origins.

Of course, as June's cited article points out, the current testing can only discover ancestors along the direct paternal or maternal line. So, most Finns along the coast are probably of mixed origin. However, it is always interesting to have some insight into ANY line!

anastom
22-01-07, 21:05
Thanks for a thorough answer.
Perhaps future DNA results will answer the question if "swedes" were around Vasa already 2000 or more years ago ?

Regards
Tommy

diogenes99
22-01-07, 21:58
Originally posted by anastom
Thanks for a thorough answer.
Perhaps future DNA results will answer the question if "swedes" were around Vasa already 2000 or more years ago ?

Regards
Tommy

When Finns (or descendants of Finns) with known Swedish paternal-line or maternal-line ancestry get tested, then the DNA can be matched with those living in Sweden. This could tell us where in Sweden they came from and possibly when.

diogenes99
31-01-07, 05:55
Thanks for a thorough answer.
Perhaps future DNA results will answer the question if "swedes" were around Vasa already 2000 or more years ago ?

Regards
Tommy

I did not mean to imply that the Swedes did not migrate into Finland before 1000 A.D. They did, and the theory is that migration occurred about 2000 years ago. The Swedes are mostly represented by haplogroup I1a in Finland. You can picture the migration path of the earliest I1a migration in this distribution graph, as they moved from Sweden eastward into Finland.


1063

harrysme
03-02-07, 15:06
I wonder if there are maps about other genotypes (N3, R1a) like that about I1a ? It was quite interesting.

Harry

diogenes99
03-02-07, 17:30
I wonder if there are maps about other genotypes (N3, R1a) like that about I1a ? It was quite interesting.

Harry

On page 51 of DEEP ANCESTRY by Spencer Wells they have a good N map and an R1a1 map. Of course, N3 takes a full stop in Finland except for the Saami herd space in northern Sweden and Norway. The article you want to look for an N3 map is:

http://www.eva.mpg.de/genetics/pdf/RootsiHumGenet07-reprint.pdf

Hasse
04-03-07, 20:41
Michael,

Seems like there is a large spectrum of different testing levels - different prices - if you order a test. What might be a good starting point when you order a kit? If I order a kit I would like to see a little about both the maternal and paternal lines. This since I have a feeling that they differ.

My wife's haplotypes would be even more interesting to see. :D

Hasse

diogenes99
04-03-07, 21:25
Michael,

Seems like there is a large spectrum of different testing levels - different prices - if you order a test. What might be a good starting point when you order a kit? If I order a kit I would like to see a little about both the maternal and paternal lines. This since I have a feeling that they differ.

My wife's haplotypes would be even more interesting to see. :D

Hasse

The test one orders depends on what one wants to accomplish. The basic Y(male line) test and mt(female-line) test are suitable for basic anthropological questions, i.e., "What continent or country did my pre-Finnish ancestors come from?" The best deal on these basic tests is the FamilyTreeDNA Y-DNA12+mtDNA test, which is $199 through Family Tree DNA. This is the Finland Project discount, which you would order when you joined. Shipping to Finland is only a few dollars. For most non-genealogists, this is the best kit combination.

You can upgrade these tests later, when you know which line you want more information about. Typically, one would upgrade to the 35 or 67 markers (from 12) to isolate the village or region of your paternal ancestors. On the maternal side, you would upgrade using the mtDNARefine test for more markers.

If you wanted to get a head start on some genealogy, then you can skip the basic tests and order two high resolution kits to start through he Finland Project: mtDNAPlus and Y-DNA37 together for $339, or a little more for the Y67. For a genealogist, this is the best way to go to start, but it depends on your wallet.

Join:
http://www.familytreedna.com/surname_join.aspx?code=P91273&special=True

diogenes99
09-03-07, 18:49
My wife's haplotypes would be even more interesting to see. :D

Hasse

Since you wifes does not have a Y chomosome, then she would order the mtDNA test alone. If you plan on ordering the mtDNA HVR1 (basic) test alone, the best deal is through the Genographic project. Then you transfar the data for free to FamilyTreeDNA. You need to check the shipping costs to know what the bottom line savings is.

If you wife has a male cousin, brother, or father, then she can order the Y-test for them to take. This way you can explore her patrilineal ancestors.

diogenes99
04-05-07, 00:13
A quick update: There are now 225 members of the Finland DNA Project. For a map of the haplotypes, see the following links:


mtdna (http://www.fidna.info/map2.php?title=mtDNA%20All%20Haplogroups&colors=mtcolors.txt&people=mtpeople.txt)
yDNA (http://www.fidna.info/map2y.php?title=Y-DNA%20All%20Haplogroups&colors=ycolors.txt)

Here are two pages on Finnish DNA:

in Finnish (http://www.fidna.info/pmw/index.php?n=Fi.Mist%e4SuomalaisetOvatTulleet)
in English (http://www.fidna.info/pmw/index.php?n=En.DNAAmpDeepAncestry)

Mary Lukkarila
04-05-07, 15:33
I recently had a mitochondrial DNA test through the National Geographic Genographic Project. It came out as Haplogroup V which does match what I have found in my mother's ancestral line. However, the Saami ancestors are far back in my ancestry. I find it extremely interesting that it would come through as the V. I now am interested in finding out about my father's ancestors. Is the Finland Project different from the National Geographic Project? I am hoping to get someone in the family to do the Y DNA and wonder which Project to choose.

diogenes99
04-05-07, 16:18
I recently had a mitochondrial DNA test through the National Geographic Genographic Project. It came out as Haplogroup V which does match what I have found in my mother's ancestral line. However, the Saami ancestors are far back in my ancestry. I find it extremely interesting that it would come through as the V. I now am interested in finding out about my father's ancestors. Is the Finland Project different from the National Geographic Project? I am hoping to get someone in the family to do the Y DNA and wonder which Project to choose.

The National Geographic Project gathers DNA information for an anonymous global database. The Finland DNA Project gathers DNA information from Finns and their descendants. Both use the same lab, which is Family Tree DNA. So you may order from either the Finland Project or National Geographic. If you order from National Geographic you will need to transfer your data, which is done on the internet for free, to the Finland Project.

Advantages of ordering through the Finland Project
-$4 shipping anywhere in world
-choice of more markers for Y test on initial order

Disadvantages of ordering through the Finland Project
-Don't receive the free migration report (optional cost $20)
-Your data is not entered for free into the National Geographic Database (optional cost $15)

To transfer your your mtDNA data to the Finland DNA Project, follow the directions here:

You can transfer your current mtDNA (or future YDNa) test information to the Finland Project through your Genographic Project member's page. First go, log in here: Transfer results (https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/process.html) Then, scroll down to the section labeled "What Else Can I Do With My Results?", click on the the "Learn more" link, and follow the prompts from there.

Finally, enter for new kit number here: Join Finland Project (http://www.familytreedna.com/ftGroupJoinLogin.aspx?joincode=P91273&special=True)

Mary Lukkarila
05-05-07, 05:12
I have now entered my information into the Finnish project. Now I have to find a male member of my family to get the Y information. Thanks for the directions to link the two projects.

Ruusu
17-06-07, 06:32
I have been considering joining this DNA project for awhile.
My Father's parents were from Finland.

I will have to contact my brother to have him do the test.

I am also interested in doing the Maternal testing, but my Mom's side of the family are French Canadians.
To order both tests, do they both need to be of Finnish descent, or would it be okay if only one (male or female) is of Finnish descent?

diogenes99
17-06-07, 07:04
I am also interested in doing the Maternal testing, but my Mom's side of the family are French Canadians.
To order both tests, do they both need to be of Finnish descent, or would it be okay if only one (male or female) is of Finnish descent?

Have your brother do the swab. His mtDNA is the same as yours, and his yDNA is your father's.

The test for both male and female can be ordered through the Finland Project. When the mtDNA results come in, you would then join a second group using the same kit number, say the French Canadian Project. In the USER PREFERENCES for each project, you would set which line (maternal or paternal) you want shown for that project.

Ruusu
22-06-07, 05:15
I've put in an order for a kit via the National Geographic project.
I understand that I can then transfer/add the results to the Finnish Project after I receive the results. Correct?

I am going to have my brother do this one. (For the YDna - paternal, Finnish side of the family).

I'll do another at a later time (for my Maternal line).

Money is a bit scarce so I couldn't order both right now. :(

Mary Lukkarila
22-06-07, 05:22
Update to my DNA project. My brother did the Y test and it came out Haplogroup N. It seems to be narrowed to a farm in Siikajoki. My great grandfather was born in Siikajoki and so now I hope I can be in contact with those who match. My maternal DNA was done through National Geographic and I had the Y test done through Family Tree DNA. It did come back a little bit quicker than the National Geographic test. I am now wondering whether I should have it tested beyond the 12 markers. Does anyone have any suggestions of whether it is worthwhile or not?

Nicholas
16-07-07, 17:41
Hi Mary,

If your brother is N from Finland, then the odds are very good that he is probably N3.

What you would learn by increasing the number of markers--say to 37-- that would probably be of importance to you, is who in Finland, and elsewhere, matches the most closely to your brother's Y DNA.

And, since the samples are supposedly matched (at FT DNA), for the next 20 years, the number of matches you find should keep increasing over time.

In our study, we do not test for less than 37 markers, as the wait to learn results seems to be longer and longer as more people sign up. Also, we want to know the level of closeness of the matches from the beginning, when we first receive the results.

I hope this helps, and that you find the connections you are looking for.

Nicholas

PS I am also in the N Y-line haplogroup.



>>Update to my DNA project. My brother did the Y test and it came out Haplogroup N. It seems to be narrowed to a farm in Siikajoki. My great grandfather was born in Siikajoki and so now I hope I can be in contact with those who match. My maternal DNA was done through National Geographic and I had the Y test done through Family Tree DNA. It did come back a little bit quicker than the National Geographic test. I am now wondering whether I should have it tested beyond the 12 markers. Does anyone have any suggestions of whether it is worthwhile or not?<<

Mary Lukkarila
17-07-07, 04:48
Hi Nicholas,

Thanks for your response. I did increase to the 25 marker and probably will go to the 37. Are you familiar with the Rurik (the 1st Russian ruler, 9th century) study? It is possible that my family is connected. They need at least 37 markers to determine a connection. The Lukkarila lineage has been the most difficult for me to research. I am hoping the DNA project can help me get past my blocks.

Mary

June Pelo
17-07-07, 22:26
Mary,

There are some interesting links to Rurik:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s044/f280325.htm go to google and check out more of his ancestry.

June

diogenes99
08-09-07, 22:23
An update:

The Finland DNA Project has about 400 members now. There was a recent meetup in Finland, and here is tha announcement from the http://www.fidna.info website:


The 1st reunion of the Finland DNA project, 8th of Sept, was made extremely successful by more than 70 active participants together with the brilliant elucidative ability of professor Kalevi Wiik.

Those who did not have the opportunity to come, can by e-mail order the book of Kalevi Wiik Where have the Finns come from (written in Finnish).

The next reunion of the Finland DNA project is planned to Duluth Minnesota in connection with the FinnFest celebration. The fest will begin on the 23rd of July, 2008.

Indicate your tentative intent to participate - not binding - to Laura Hayden at the address fimtdna*gmail.com.

Nicholas
10-09-07, 07:18
Hi mary,

Apologies for being so long in repolying. I have not been as active as I would like to be, on this list. (Spending a bit too much time on the DNA newbie lists, and such!)

I have read a bit about Rurik, but will have to read up (and see the link June posted), to remind myself of the history.

If you test 37 markers, and have success with this line as a definite connection, I hope that you will report your news on this list. I am certain everyone here will be interested in the results.

Successe stories are always welcome!

Nicholas



Hi Nicholas,

Thanks for your response. I did increase to the 25 marker and probably will go to the 37. Are you familiar with the Rurik (the 1st Russian ruler, 9th century) study? It is possible that my family is connected. They need at least 37 markers to determine a connection. The Lukkarila lineage has been the most difficult for me to research. I am hoping the DNA project can help me get past my blocks.

Mary

Ruusu
14-09-07, 18:27
I sent in my DNA samples about the end of June (via National Geographic).
For 3 weeks now I have had the following message at their site:


Your sample has completed the DNA analysis phase of testing. However, during quality control your initial results failed to clearly indicate your haplogroup. We must perform additional testing to accurately determine your deep ancestral lineage. This is not uncommon, but will delay the posting of your results by two to three weeks.

We appreciate your patience. Please also note that this delay is a sign of the Project's success in increasing the diversity of samples in our database.

If we find that there is a problem at any point during the processing of your sample, you will receive an updated message when you log in to check your status.

My Gosh, I am getting so tired of waiting - this is taking forever!!

Ruusu
19-09-07, 16:03
Yay! My results are in!! (via the Genographic Project)

Y-DNA = Haplogroup N (LLY22G)


I did the 12 marker test.
I would like to upgrade eventually, but that will have to wait for awhile.

I have also joined the Finland DNA Project.

Ruusu
20-09-07, 15:14
And, I have another question.

Previously there was a comment that if the Y-DNA results show haplogroup N, then it's very likely that it is N3.

How would I find out something like this?
Would it be through increasing the markers tested?

I am finding this all so very fascinating, but also very confusing.

diogenes99
22-09-07, 05:40
And, I have another question.

Previously there was a comment that if the Y-DNA results show haplogroup N, then it's very likely that it is N3.

How would I find out something like this?
Would it be through increasing the markers tested?

I am finding this all so very fascinating, but also very confusing.

Family Tree DNA Is planning to offer the N3 subclade test soon. If you are a Finnish N, then you are likely an N3.

Also, here is an article about the project:

http://priima.yle.fi/node/206

Ruusu
22-09-07, 06:23
Thank you, but I could not read anything on that link.
I do not know any Finnish at all. :(

Perhaps a brief summary?

Mauri Myllylä
10-10-07, 19:02
Hi Nicholas,

Thanks for your response. I did increase to the 25 marker and probably will go to the 37. Are you familiar with the Rurik (the 1st Russian ruler, 9th century) study? It is possible that my family is connected. They need at least 37 markers to determine a connection. The Lukkarila lineage has been the most difficult for me to research. I am hoping the DNA project can help me get past my blocks.

Mary


Hello Mary,

I am new here and this is first time I participate in this forum. I woke up when noticed your surname. I am finnish national and my roots go to Northern Ostrabothnia where I have ancestors in Vihanti, Oulainen, Paavola, Siikajoki etc.

I have no Lukkarila in my ancestors, but I know there is Lukkarila house in Vihanti, some of my ancestors have lived in this house in the begining of 1700s. So I am a little curious to know about your ancestors, if they arose from this farmhouse.

Please look at my genealogy summary which can be found at address
http://www.elisanet.fi/mauri_my/ . Perhaps you can find some familiar names.

Mauri

Mary Lukkarila
11-10-07, 04:18
Hi Mauri,

I am told that the coordinates of my family's Y DNA, Haplogroup N, are for the Vuotila farm near the church in Siikajoki. I did not recognize the names that you had for that area in my family but I do know someone who has Sipo in their ancestry. However, I am certain we are related through the Sursill family. My mother's family was from Kuusamo and Pudasjärvi.

syrene
14-10-07, 04:45
In FAR newspaper:

Prof Auvo Kostiainen
School of History
University of Turku
51-20014 Turku
Finland

aukostie*utu.fi

He's interested in descendents of New Sweden Colonists.
Syrene

JenniferRipley
22-10-07, 01:31
Finally, results from FTDNA
Haplogroup N--to Matti Mattinpoika Fors-- Isokyro 1750s
H1b to Hyytinen-Ollila farms, Laapajarvi 1650s

My families aren't related to the famous Ruirik or famous Finns or Swedes. But they had sisu! To travel many days to a land where they didn't know the language on boats with names they probably couldn't pronounce at ages like 14 to work hard at the docks in places like Fairport Harbor to someday own a piece of the co-op or a farm of their own.

Basic DNA research isn't any harder than starting your genealogy with constantly changing farmnames or the mis-prints of U.S. census takers of Finnish names. Really--it's not some mysterious black hole science that seems too much like that physics class I failed! Yes, it costs money, but not too much for many of us to start, especially with the discounts offered by many of the projects.

It is magical to know my grandmothers made their way from Iberia to Finland and my grandfathers from the steppes of the Urals!

JenniferRipley
12-03-10, 18:21
More current DNA info.
There is no plain haplogroup N in Finland, it is usually N1C1, over 50% of Finnish men still fall within this DNA catagory. A real N1C1 expert can be found at DNA_FORUMS.com (http://DNA_FORUMS.com). His user name is Mougley.

It makes more sense to me now to think that my H1b women spent time within the Ukrainian refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum. Plainly, it's way closer to Finland than Iberia!

I have one full genomic sequence match with a new Finnish friend who lives in Tampere. We trace our ancestress to the area around Alajarvi but she probably lived before record-keeping. Testing companies like to say that full mt-DNA matches usually fall within 10 generations, sadly this has not proved to be true for this match (yet!)

Jennifer

URL corrected from .org to .com /Hasse

kivinen1
13-03-10, 09:32
Just a quick correction to the above:

The N expert is mouglley

If anyone tries to search for him.

JenniferRipley
13-03-10, 14:12
it's DNA-Forums.com, rather than _org too

Jennifer Ripley,
Searching Piispanen/Paananen, Mononen in Orismala, Krook,
Silander, Pynttari