PDA

View Full Version : Scams on Internet



Hasse
08-02-07, 11:30
Every day more scams on Internet and via email.

Today I looked into one "phishing" scam where somebody tries to get people give avay their login information to bankaccounts etc.

This message was "Unlock your Capital One account immediately !!" and a message with, as it seems, proper links to the company in question. Of course the addresses were fony.

The addresses links to this (http://256k.org/) machine. A small personal computer site. You can see the guys computer equipment. When fooling around a little in his directory online one can even find what he looks like... He presents lots of pictures of himself, friends and surroundings here (http://256k.org/duff/img/). Mister Duff - is this (http://256k.org/duff/img/duff-and-erika%5b2006%5d.jpg) you by any chance? All these links are open on the net...

The site's presence on the net is:
PING 256k.org (64.235.97.206): 56 data bytes
Server Name: NS1.RAFLAR.COM
IP Address: 64.235.97.206Aren't these afraid of being caught anymore?

Take a good look folks - the computer you can see seems to one which sends out thousands and thousands of spam mails of type "phishing" today. Is this what these abusers look like - and where they are from?

Here you will see a few snapshots from the web site - will probably have to erase them after a day or two...

K-G Molander
08-02-07, 16:20
It is sad what this world is becoming.

Karen Norwillo
08-02-07, 18:15
Just the other day I got an email titled "Your Capital account has been suspended!!!!!!" That's good, I never had an account. I get these types of emails almost daily. The delete button gets a workout.

June Pelo
08-02-07, 21:23
The other day our paper mentioned that recently there have been a lot of scams coming out of Korea - I can't remember if it was North or South Korea.

June

Denise
08-02-07, 21:29
Hello Hasse:
My name is Fred. I'm Denise's husband.
I have always practiced computers with this in mind. When it comes to personal information or answering anything from the net. Call the company associated with the e-mail directly from records in your own files, and never trust the web as it is worse every day than the one before it. That being said. Remember the old axiom if it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

Hasse
09-02-07, 08:26
My point with my original message was that it seems like people nowadays can do it more or less in the open without having too big a risk of getting sued.

The address was active til yesterday. Today the domain 256k.org presents itself as poemfone.org - rapid changes, isn't it?
PING poemfone.org (64.235.97.206): 56 data bytes...this time properly with an SSL certificate presentation (see below).

During these days the same IP number responds with the raflar.com domain - a company making websites mainly for the betting and gaming industries.
PING raflar.com (64.235.97.206): 56 data bytesSeems like some of our friends in Canada try to flood our email with criminal emails?

Traceroute to the site gives interesting result...
...
18 v3492.mpd01.yyz02.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.5.82) 134.235 ms 134.962 ms 139.958 ms
19 packet-tel.demarc.cogentco.com (38.112.21.254) 135.127 ms 143.962 ms 135.538 ms
20 180c-7204.packetworks.net (64.235.102.190) 137.860 ms 139.431 ms 138.439 ms
21 poemfone.org (64.235.97.206) 139.726 ms 139.187 ms 139.808 msPacketworks.net points to Canada also...

Seems like a lot of phishing emails will be distributed from poemfone.org today...

At least - for every banking, credit card, paypal query asking for whatever verification... Transfer directly to the bit bucket!

sune
09-02-07, 09:00
A local ISP here in Borgå had to shut down for over a week due to mail bombing e few years ago. One of their customers har probably done something that de net community didn't approve of.

Wouldn't it feasable to mail bomb these spammers or at least their ISPs out of the cyberspace?


Sune