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Denise
22-03-07, 02:07
Hi,
I was born in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and still have family there, my mother for one. Saw this article on the Yooper language and how it evolved from French Canadians, Finns, and American Indians, etc.. Thought the article was interesting! :) Check it out.
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070321/UPDATE/703210447
Denise

Karen Norwillo
22-03-07, 18:11
Hej Denise, Took me a long time to lose my Yooper "accent" when we moved to PA from Crystal Falls and only takes a day or so to regain it when I visit home. I still have loads of family in the UP. Karen

Jaska Sarell
22-03-07, 23:34
Hi Yoopers!

Is there any site where I could have a possibility to hear samples of Yooper dialect? That would be interesting for us Finns.

Maybe I could understand it better than American speech in general :eek:
One reason I prefer English TV series - usually no need to read the subtitles.

:) Jaska

Denise
22-03-07, 23:51
Hi,
Here is a very CRUDE example of the Yooper dialect. There is a group that records songs in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan called "Da Yoopers", and they have a retail store filled with all kinds of Yooper merchandise. These songs probably aren't for all ears to listen to!!! :rolleyes:
http://www.dayoopers.com/theater.html (to hear music and language)
http://www.dayoopers.com/ (the official site)

The music is a very exagerrated version of the way most people speak in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan! Usually with a few beers in them!!! :D

Denise

Denise
23-03-07, 00:44
Hi,
Here are some more sites to check out. :D http://www.umich.edu/news/MT/NewsE/07_05/words.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yooper_dialect

http://members.tripod.com/~Kathe/

http://www.progressiveu.org/150758-ya-know-your-a-yooper-when

http://www.answers.com/topic/yooper-dialect

http://www.searchnewz.com/blog/talk/sn-6-20060711LanguageDialectandGoogle.html

http://www.msu.edu/~mille544/yoopertalk.html

http://pasty.com/

Jaska Sarell
23-03-07, 01:11
Thank ya Denise!

I listened to Da Yoopers' stuff. The last two can be only produced by someone having Finnish descent :D
I should have had more than one beer for authentic listening pleasure :p

Will check the other sites tomorrow.

:) Jaska

sune
23-03-07, 11:02
There are some good musicians playing. The harmonica in "Diarrhea takes me back to when i was a kid. My father had played the guitar in a swing quartet in the 1940ies together with a guy who played the harmonica exactly in the same way. Sometimes when they met later in life they had a small jam session playing old jazz standards of their youth. The music relies on big harmonies and, like Finnish jazz musicians used to say, it swings like an elk.

And Karen, it's funny how dialect sticks. I was born in Jakobstad, but when I was three years old we moved to Åbo. I continued to speak Ostrobothnian dialect with my father and when we visited my aunts uncles and cousins in Jakobstad about once a year. Otherwise I spoke "standard" Swedish. But whenever I meet an Ostrobothian I speak dialect. I just can't bring myself to speak "book" Swedish with Hasse. When we meet professionally in my office we talk dialect to the annoyance of my workmates, who don't understand what we are saying…

Sune

Sune

Hasse
23-03-07, 11:12
...I just can't bring myself to speak "book" Swedish with Hasse. When we meet professionally in my office we talk dialect to the annoyance of my workmates, who don't understand what we are saying…

söis ere me hedee grondsprååtzi, "that's the way it is"

The perhaps worn out saying is "Ja tala va'ja'vil å tö fåå tala va'dö kann"

Karen Norwillo
23-03-07, 17:57
My "vanity" license plate on the front of my car says YOOPER. I can't tell you how many questions I get about that. Bought it in a store in Crystal Falls on one of my visits home a few years ago.

June Pelo
23-03-07, 17:57
Jaska wrote:
Maybe I could understand it better than American speech in general
One reason I prefer English TV series - usually no need to read the subtitles.

Over here there's a British chef who appears on the Food Network. Her name is Nigella. None of us can understand what she says, so we just watch what she does.

June :)

sune
23-03-07, 22:46
We have had Nigella here too. I had not trouble understanding her, but over the years i have got more accustomed to some of the American dialects, even though my English teacher was very strict and demanded that we spoke standard British English. ("Lonesome is a nonexistent word, so don't use it!" "But, miss Emeleus, Elvis Presley sings ’Are You Lonesome Tonight’." "I do not care which words mister Presley uses. He is an American and you are supposed to learn English!" end of discussion).

I guess that the steady flow of American films, sitcoms, soaps, et.c. has trained my ear to the language. Now I feel that American English is more casual, "loose in the edges" while Oxford English sounds (pardon me you all English members, no offence intended) a little "uptight".

Sune

Denise
24-03-07, 16:36
Hi,
I too get that Yooper dialect going when I go to visit the Upper Peninsula as most of my relatives have it; some more than others. But... what puzzles me, is my parents moved to a suburb of Detroit, Michigan when I was about one year old! And I grew up in the Detroit area! It must be contagious! Or my parents had more of an accent than I realize.
I just e-mailed Michigan Tech about the Yooper dialect, and questioned whether the foreign students attending the college there ended up with the Yooper accent too as they have students from all over the world. I am curious! :D Hopefully they answer me and I'll let you know what I find out.


Denise

Alice Finnerty
25-03-07, 04:02
When I come back from visiting relatives in the UP I find myself bringing back a bit of the dialect. I Love it! eh? And you know that those who live it the mitt are refered to as "Trolls" as we live below the Mighty Mac Bridge.
Does anyone remember the Swedish Chef muppet? or the TV show about the Swedish girl called Farmer's Daughter?

sune
25-03-07, 15:12
The Swedish chef was impossible to undersand "hurp te durp te durp" or that's what ut sounded like.

Wasn't it Inger Stewens who played the farmer's daughter? So her accent should have been genuine instead of fake Hollywood Swenglish.


Sune