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Cherykery
06-09-07, 16:25
Hello All,
I'm a bit confused! I have found some information about some of my Finnish ancestors but this info says they were born in Sweden. When I said "no"...they were born in Sweden I was told that they are Finnish. Could someone explain this please? The birth years were in the early to mid 1800's.
Thanks!
Cheryl:confused:

Karen Norwillo
06-09-07, 18:21
Cheryl,
First of all, where did you get the information that they were born in Sweden? If you have birth records, it is certainly possible that at some point Finns emigrated to Sweden and the children born there considered themselves Finn-Swedes. Just as many of my ancestors born in the Swedish-speaking part of Finland considered themselves Swede-Finns. Don't forget Finland and Sweden are closely tied in the early years. Many times when my ancestors emigrated and someone asked what they were, they said Swede, because they spoke Swedish, even though they were born in Finland. It was very confusing for me too.
Karen

sune
06-09-07, 21:54
… and remember that Finland was an integrated part of Sweden until 1809. Finland has in fact been a part of Sweden for more year than the southern part of the country, Skåne, that belonged to Denmark until the late 1600s

Sune

b hietala
07-09-07, 04:59
Consider owning a farm near a river and being part of a Finnish community who speaks the language and observe the customs... And then, someone comes along and informs you that you are now a Swede because the new border follows the river and you are on the Swedish side. So, is the story of many Finnish communities along the Tornio River. When my grandfather immigrated in 1909, he couldn't decide if he was a former subject of the Czar of Russia or the King of Sweden. And I have the immigration papers to prove it. Finland was not an independent nation yet and I'm not sure he cared. He was what he was. So, anyway, I consider myself Finnish because of my Finnish roots and culture, even though I have one grandfather who was born 20 miles west of the present border.

Cherykery
07-09-07, 12:55
Thank You All!
I do have a friend from MN that has contacted a genealogist in Sweden to see if they can find any records on this line of our family - Lampinen, changed to Erickson in US. I am relatively new to genealogy and am just now looking in to the history of Finland. I have also seen a few of our ancestors that have Russian on a few of their draft cards.
It has also been said that Sonja Henie is a distant cousin of the family. I am hoping to one day run across that connection.
Thanks Again!
Cheryl

granskare
08-09-07, 04:17
http://www.foark.umu.se/census/Index.htm
here's the 1890 census of the northern counties of Sweden where most Finns live. Maybe you can find something?
also, the Swenson links page:
http://www.augustana.edu/swenson/Links.html
good luck

sune
08-09-07, 19:00
… I have also seen a few of our ancestors that have Russian on a few of their draft cards …

That is because Finland belonged to Russia between 1809 and 1917. Finland wasn't an independent country, so Finns were Russian subjects.

Sune

Karen Douglas
08-09-07, 19:33
Hi Sune,

I understand that Finland belonged to Russia between 1809 and 1917. But, how did Finland resolve the issue about Women's Rights? Alledgedly, Finland was the first country in Europe to give women the right to vote, and that was in 1906. Did Finland have an accepted and recognized government. or did they have to get permission from Russia to proceed with this?

Karen

June Pelo
08-09-07, 21:05
Finland became a Grand Duchy of Russia in 1809, and its laws and constitution remained intact. You can read more about it here:
http://countrystudies.us/finland/10.htm

June

sune
08-09-07, 23:16
Finland was ruled by a General Governor appointed by the Russian emperor, but we had our own parliament and a senate appointed by the emperor. This could however meet only when summoned by the emperor who could chose not to confirm the decisions made by the parliament. The reform that gave women the right to vote came about after a general strike. The reform gave in fact everybody the right to vote. Before that only the members i.e. the men) of the gentry, the clergy, the burghers and land owning farmers could vote. After 1906 workers, farm hands maids, et.c. could also vote.

The parliamentary reform of 1906 became later the basis for our first constitution as an independent country.

Sune

Karen Douglas
08-09-07, 23:51
Hi Sune,

Thanks so much for the detailed explanation. My Finnish-born mother passed away several years ago but she was so proud that women in Finland had the right to vote 14 years before women in the the United States. She would always say: "Finnish women led the way!" :)

Karen

Cherykery
09-09-07, 16:42
How interesting and thank you all for the links.
Cheryl

Kaj Granlund
10-09-07, 09:10
Women weren't just allowed to vote but also to be candidates.

One more link:

http://www.aanioikeus.fi/en/index.htm

sune
10-09-07, 12:46
There was a nation wide appeal for womens right to vote. Signed addresses and telegrams were sent from all over the country to a meeting in Helsingfors November 7th 1904. You will find the appeals and the names of those who signed them here: http://www.histdoc.net/varia/uniooni4.html.

The appealers were mostly women. but in Mariehamn and Jakobstad several men also took part, among them my grandfather Gustaf Portin and my maternal grandfather's brother Halvar Backlund.

The signers in Jakobstad came from every part of society, burghers, merchants, doctors, blue collar workers et.c.

Sune

b hietala
11-09-07, 06:15
Sune,

Is this document available in English?

BH

sune
11-09-07, 10:10
Is this document available in English?

I am sorry I haven't found it in English. The web version is part of a site maintained by Pauli Kruhse. He has published a large variety of historical documents on http://www.histdoc.net/. The site is a gold mine for those who are interested in Finnish history through time. Many of them are in English but not this one. The site is worth visiting.

Sune