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lasare2
22-09-07, 23:48
I need help with "krutgumma" In the US "pistol packin mama" is about as
close as I get. ????? (Stuck with some translation project)

Lasare2

June Pelo
23-09-07, 01:52
Bill, I think krutgubbe is a touch old man, so maybe krutgumma is a tough old woman!!

June :)

lasare2
23-09-07, 03:53
My S/E Dictionary defines Krut as gunpowder and I couldn't quite see
this nice lady from Munsala about whom I was reading the kind who would
"do" someone "in". She wound up in Telluride. Colorado with her husband
and back in the 1800's that part of the West was anything but a place
where the "six gun" was law. I hope my dictionary is wrong for her sake.

Lasare2

cdahlin
23-09-07, 08:46
Yes, June is completely right. A "krutgumma" has nothing to do with guns or gunpowder at all. Just a tough old woman!

Christian

lasare2
23-09-07, 17:16
Connecting a few more dots, Brita Lovisa Jakobsdotter Knuts had a sister
named Lena who married a guy named Marten and these two turn up on
the Ahnentafel as the parents of a daughter named Ida Johanna who was
my mother. I know from hearing about her that Lena was "one tough
lady" who raised nine children and her resume was extensive even to
include avtivity in the Mona Baptist congregation. Makes me want to add
"Knuts" to my birth certificate. I'll check my DNA.
Thanks for erasing those pistols in their holsters.
Any suggestion for a GOOD Swedish/ English Dictionary?

Lasare 2

cdahlin
23-09-07, 20:26
Yes, that is what we call "En riktig krutgumma".

Christian

lasare2
23-09-07, 22:49
Grandmother Lena Sophia was not to be helf captive by nine children she and Marten brought into this world. Busy as she wass with household chores,
midwifing when called on, keeping that one-room stugga clean and warm, when called on to be "out of the house" Lena had a series of six chairs or stools , at the time, and each child knew his/her chair much like cows returning to the barn for milking, each takes to his own stall, Strict orders to stay put and not move until she got back. My Aunt Anna (second born) told this to her daughter Helen Bowlby,who passed it on to me from her home in
Florida. At times of my rank disbedience, a fatherless boy since age four, I was often led to the basement of our home and mother Ida Johanna, seventh
child of Lena and Marten, believed in "tradition" much like Tevye in "Fiddler On The Roof", and administered justice with a soft leather strap which she might have taken down from its hook in that one room stugga when she came to the U.S.. God bless her memory and her sense of responsibility. I'm
still around after 85 years of fairly respectable living and expecting many more, still possessing a strong sense of right and wrong and enjoying discovering more of this legacy of mine through Finlander.

Tusen Tack, Alla

Lasare2

uspjj
30-09-07, 21:24
Swedish-English Lexicon I use:
http://lexin.nada.kth.se/lexin-en.html
The dictionaries have been issued by the Swedish National Agency for School Improvement and to my knowledge they are very good, even manages SOME misspelled words.
Another very nice site is:
http://swedia.ling.gu.se/
Where you can listen to different Swedish dialects.
Unfortunately its only in Swedish.
'Dialect-map" : http://swedia.ling.gu.se/info/litenkarta.html

brgds,
peter

lasare2
30-09-07, 22:06
Thank you Peter for the very helpful information which takes me
beyond my Swedish/English Dictionary

Tusen Tack

Bill Wright

uspjj
30-09-07, 23:04
If you understand some swedish, use swedish Wikipedia, there's a lot of information, for example:
http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C3%A4rpes

More swedish, a site documenting the trade from Närpes, Österbotten to Stockholm in the 15th century. The information is collected from archives at Customs in Stockholm, very interesting! I wish they would translate that, gives you an idea on how our ancestors. You can even find the names of the Skippers !
http://sydaby.eget.net/ody/bs1.htm

And lastly, to read and understand more where the 'krutgumma' and 'krutgubbe' got their stubberness from read the book written by Eric Newby: 'The last Grain Race'.
brgds

lasare2
01-10-07, 17:42
At the risk of "over-doing" it, I would like to say that the term is applicable
today upon a descendent of Brita and Lena, my sister Evelyn, who is 93
years old and a month ago fell and broke her leg, Undaunted,she went
through surgery. steel rod and all, and is thriving in rehab and expects an
early dismissal, meanwhile she stays in contact with "the world" using her
laptop to stay current with her very lengthy address book. My personal
thought is that Brita and Lena are "looking down" in pride at this modern
Krutgumma, who, here in the U.S. is likewise described as "One tough
Cookie". Evelyn and her husband, Bill, live in Florida.

Lasare2

sune
01-10-07, 22:00
Another way to put it is to say that she's got sisu, but that is Finnish…

Sune

lasare2
27-12-08, 18:40
Let me express publicly my "thanks" to the research committee who wrote the excellent work "Sendityvvon", On page 143ff, I read of the journey of my great aunt who journeyed to Telluride. Colorado and the tragic misfortune she experienced there in the accidental death of her husband. Truly Brita Lovisa Jakobsdotter Knuts (1848-1907) was every bit "ein riktig krutgumma"
My wife's passing a year ago made necessary the laying aside of my "translation" effort. I have grandchildren, totally "Americanized" who need to read about her, truly an "American Widow" which is my next writing project.
If possibile,.I would like to chat with any existing members of that research committee to glean further the rich history of Monå by Munsala even written about in Camilla Asplundh Ingemark's "The Genre of the Trolls" (2004), my mother Ida Johanna Mårtensdotter "home town"
any response appreciated

Bill Wright Lasare2*aol.com

lasare2
27-12-08, 21:53
Correcting the German "ein" for the proper Swedish "en", lest the spirit of Brita Lovisa remind me

Bill Wright Lasare2*aol.com

kivinen1
30-12-08, 02:06
Actually, If you Google the part that is highlighted below, you can choose a translation, the line is the beginning text of the document:

På 1500-talet sträckte sig Närpes från Petalax i norr till Sideby i söder


If you copy and paste that into your Google browser, the article should come up and a {not perfect} translation comes available.

Maybe this link will work too: http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sv&u=http://www.sydaby.eget.net/ody/bs1.htm&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=1&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3DP%25C3%25A5%2B1500-talet%2Bstr%25C3%25A4ckte%2Bsig%2BN%25C3%25A4rpes% 2Bfr%25C3%25A5n%2BPetalax%2Bi%2Bnorr%2Btill%2BSide by%2Bi%2Bs%25C3%25B6der%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG


Swedish-English Lexicon I use:
http://lexin.nada.kth.se/lexin-en.html
The dictionaries have been issued by the Swedish National Agency for School Improvement and to my knowledge they are very good, even manages SOME misspelled words.
Another very nice site is:
http://swedia.ling.gu.se/
Where you can listen to different Swedish dialects.
Unfortunately its only in Swedish.
'Dialect-map" : http://swedia.ling.gu.se/info/litenkarta.html

brgds,
peter

lasare2
30-12-08, 17:56
Many thanks to Ilmari for the good help in translation. Words my
dictionary didn't have such as "bröstkorgen" popped right up on my screen,
giving me the exact injury of "great uncle -inl aw", Anders Mattson Ryss ,
experienced in that tragic incident on the St. Miguel river in Colorado which
eventually resulted in his death, and making it necessary for wife Brita
Lovisa to return to Finland, in deep sorrow.

Tusen tack

Lasare2