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Therese
16-01-08, 13:55
Hello, my name is Therese Andersson and Im from Mariehamn in Åland, Finland and I am a new member here.

Im looking for descendants to Carpenter Karl August Karlsson from Lillbolstad Hammarland and Olga Maria Andersson from Eckerö Böle, they married 13 Sep 1888 in New York at the Seamen's church. They got (at least) two children, Frank August (born 1889-08-11) and Carl Johan Walter (born 1891-07-04). Their last name should have been Karlsson (Carlson).

Olga Maria was my great grandfathers sister (farfarfars syster) and we dont know anything about her other than that she went to the states. Now we found out she got two children and I wonder how I can trace them and their living relatives today (if there are any)?

Therese

June Pelo
17-01-08, 02:25
I think Ingemar Ekman will be able to help you when he reads your message. He's our expert on Åland.

Welcome to Finlander Forum :)

June

Karen Norwillo
17-01-08, 17:12
Therese,
I don't know if this could be your Karl August, but he's from Åland originally and there's a picture. It's a passport application from 1919. The text is on the right side of the first image and the rest is on the left side of the second.
It may be that he used August instead of Karl, or it may be no relation. Thought I'd give it a try. Do you have DOB for Karl and Olga? Karen

Denise
17-01-08, 17:21
Hi,
Have you tried emailing the Seaman's Church? newyork*swedishchurch.net
I have been trying for a couple days now on Ancestry to help you, and have not been able to find any leads with these names that match. :(
http://www.swedishchurch.net/index2.asp?id=1

Best Regards,
Denise

Denise
17-01-08, 17:44
Hi,
After reading the history of this Seaman's Church, I have questions about the marriage of Olga and Karl. This church was not built yet when they were married in 1888. :confused:


Denise

History:
"Three Questions About the Building
Many visitors ask about the fantastic building that has been the Swedish Church in New York since 1978. Often they are curious about the age and history of the location. The answer that is usually given to the most common question is that the building was built during the 1870’s. Another answer is that during its first 50 years, the building was a private residence. A third answer is that the building was renovated in the 1920’s with money donated by a man, millionaire James Talcott. None of these answers are correct. First of all, the building was not built during the 1870’s. Secondly, it was never a private residence. Thirdly, there was no man during the 1920’s who donated any money. However, there was a woman. The forgotten lady is worthy of finally being recognized. For it is thanks to her that the building exists.



The Woman Who Paid
Mrs. Henrietta E. Francis Talcott was a generous New Yorker in the early 1900’s. In 1920 she donated $250,000 to the New York Bible Society. They received the funds to build their own building. It was an enormous sum of money in the early 1920’s.

Who Was She?
All her life Henrietta E. Francis Talcott was interested in theology. Her father was a Presbyterian minister and she grew up in Bridgehampton on Long Island. During her adult life she belonged to New York’s richest society circle, which was a prerequisite for her large donations. For a rich woman great fortune was a way to be a participant in high society life. It was, of course, a period when women were restrained from having significant leadership positions. She donated $100,000 to Barnard College for a professorship in bible studies. At the residence on 54th Street she was the lady of the house and mother of four children. In 1920, when she donated money to the New York Bible Society to build a building, she did so in memory of her husband, millionaire James Talcott. He died in 1916 and despite what was said, it was not he who donated the money. It was she. Mrs. Talcott herself died unexpectedly of a heart attack in December of 1921. She was 79 years old. It is unclear if she managed to see the building completed. The year she died, the building was ready to be occupied. By then it had taken over a year to prepare.

The Building Received a Silver Medal
It was designed by architect Wilfred E. Anthony (1878-1948). The building was awarded a silver medal: the Fifth Avenue Association gave him second prize in the Best New Building category of 1921 in the Fifth Avenue area. That year there were many candidates up for recognition: after World War I, Manhattan transformed into a huge construction site and in the 1920’s the housing rush was in full speed. Otherwise Anthony mainly designed Catholic Church buildings; an example in Manhattan is Saint Catherine’s of Siena’s Dominican Dome Church on 67th Street. Outside of New York he designed Duns Scotus College in Detroit, among other projects.

The Seamen’s Church
It was actually a new building that was constructed with Mrs. Talcott’s money. The assignment that the building should be a 1870’s style palace, no doubt, gets confused with the fact that the Swedish Evangelical Mission (EFS, a mission movement within the Church of Sweden) began services for seamen in New York on the first Sunday in Advent in 1873.

The location was the German-Scandinavian immigrant’s home chapel. At the altar stood Reverend John Swärd. He had just been sent over from Sweden. A portion of church attendees are still “sea people”. Due to short docking times, church personnel go to the harbors and meet the seamen onboard approximately three times a week.

Ancestry From the 1600’s
Already starting in the 1600’s Swedish services were being celebrated on the North American East coast. The Swedish Church’s first bishop for the North American congregation was Jesper Swedberg (1653–1735). At the same time he was bishop for North America he was also the bishop for Skara, Sweden. He wrote many letters to the Swedish congregation in North America, but he never came over the Atlantic. Today the congregations of Church of Sweden Abroad are administered by the Visby diocese.

A Warm Embrace
The building Henrietta E. Talcott funded was bought by the Church of Sweden Abroad in 1978. Amidst the office skyscrapers and exclusive boutiques, the Swedish Church serves as a warm embrace. Thousands and thousands of people “come home” to the church every year."

Therese
17-01-08, 20:49
Hi June,

Thank you, Im glad that I found my way here - its actually Ingemar who gave me the suggestion that I should try my luck with my research here at the Finlander forum!

//Therese

Therese
17-01-08, 23:17
Therese,
I don't know if this could be your Karl August, but he's from Åland originally and there's a picture. It's a passport application from 1919. The text is on the right side of the first image and the rest is on the left side of the second.
It may be that he used August instead of Karl, or it may be no relation. Thought I'd give it a try. Do you have DOB for Karl and Olga? Karen
Hi Karen, thank You so much for Your help. I dont know and I havent been able so far to determine if its the right Carlsson. Unfortunately I havent found his birthtday either. Olga Maria (Andersdotter or Andersson) was born 10th of September 1867 (10.09.1867) in Eckerö, Åland. Olga had one sister, Emma Sirena Andersdotter and two brothers, Anders Andersson and Eric Andersson.
I descend from Anders (Anders-Hugo-Ulf-Therese, all Andersson).

Im a beginner at this so just finding the right places to search in and to figure out how to search is a challenge right now...but very, very exciting :-)

Therese
17-01-08, 23:36
Hi,
Have you tried emailing the Seaman's Church? newyork*swedishchurch.net
I have been trying for a couple days now on Ancestry to help you, and have not been able to find any leads with these names that match. :(
http://www.swedishchurch.net/index2.asp?id=1

Best Regards,
Denise
Hi Denise, thank You for helping!
Olga got married in the Finnish Seamen church 1888, I found statistics here http://www.sfhs.eget.net/NYSeamensChurch.html but this is also everything I know about her (and that she got two sons).

Therese

Ingemar Ekman
28-01-08, 19:46
Hi Therese,
The records on the micro film for the Finnish Seamen's mission church in New York are Marriage records 1887-1931, Birth records 1887-1930, Confirmation records 1887-1930 and death records 1887-1931. I looked in my updated file I made previous year, mostly of the candidates for confirmations 1888 - 1912
but I did not find Frank August or Carl Johan Walter.
I hope someone with access to Census records will be able to find your family.
/ Ingemar