PDA

View Full Version : From Pennsylvania to California



nikus
15-06-08, 14:10
Hi everybody:)
My grandmother´s uncles were among the first emigrants from Vörå to America. Their first letters were written in Pennsylvania in 1872 and 1873. The next letter comes from Gualala, California in 1875. They stayed in the redwoods until 1890, cutting redwood and also digging for gold.
I have always wondered how they travelled to California. They mention leaving New York on a steam boat. But where did it take them? There could not possibly have been a railroad across the country in the southern states? There was also no Panama Canal. Who knows?
Torbjörn

Karen Norwillo
15-06-08, 17:21
Hej Torbjörn,
You don't say where in PA your ancestors lived, but steamboat travel was used on all the Great Lakes and many of the rivers, especially the Niagra River. Lake Erie is situated between western PA and NY. It's possible they went by boat into Canada and then on to CA. Or, the Transcontinental Railroad was completed by that time and they could have gone that route across the US. I see Gualala was a big logging area during that time and was on the mouth of the Pacific where the Gualala River empties. Good to see you here again. It's been awhile. Karen

nikus
15-06-08, 18:00
Hej Karen!
They never mentioned any names. They were both working on a railroad 575 miles from NY, 23 Vörå boys staying together with a Swedish lady at her boarding house. The journey from home to NY took exactly one month. They paid 15 $ a month.
Before heading West one of the brothers was working at a brick factory. The name looks like Bnugens Factory(?) to me.
Your theory makes sense, thank you Karen!
Torbjörn

kivinen1
16-06-08, 04:15
Hej Karen!
They never mentioned any names. They were both working on a railroad 575 miles from NY, 23 Vörå boys staying together with a Swedish lady at her boarding house. The journey from home to NY took exactly one month. They paid 15 $ a month.
Before heading West one of the brothers was working at a brick factory. The name looks like Bnugens Factory(?) to me.
Your theory makes sense, thank you Karen!
Torbjörn
In a New York neighborhood, called Mott Haven, there are lot's of buildings made of brick. There is also a street named "Bruckner", and this area is an industrial neighborhood that used immigrant labor in it's factories. The factories of that time were foundries, distributors, piano makers and cigar makers. Also, there was a large housing projects made of brick.

Obviously, for such a large industrial area with all kinds of factories that were made of brick, there had to be a brick maker in close proximity. So far, the brick makers are not listed, but it is pointed out that they are made of brick.

nikus
16-06-08, 09:00
Thank you kivinen1!

sten47
16-06-08, 22:08
The Trans Continental Railroad was completed in 10 May 1869. Barbara

sten47
17-06-08, 03:14
I have read that some from the East Coast settlers would take a boat around South America to California,(It would take about 2 1/2 months) and others would take a ship to New Orleans. Some of the orginal Mormon Pioneers 1850-1855 came into New Orleans and took a steamer up the Mississippi to meet their wagon trains. Barb

nikus
17-06-08, 07:07
That´s what I thought too. That they had to sail all the way around S America. The great lakes and the railroad sounds like a btter idea.
Thanks Barb!
Torbjörn

Karen Norwillo
17-06-08, 15:37
Happy Birthday, Torbjörn. Hope you have a great day. Sorry I missed seeing you in Finland this trip. Karen

Karen Norwillo
17-06-08, 16:11
I found a site about brick-making in NY State. It seems most of the factories were along the Hudson in the Hudson River Valley. There were at it's prime over 140 factories making bricks. In the 1880's there were only 40. The Cornell Steamboat Co. hauled bricks to NYC. The companies beginning with B that could be possibilities were Bonner Brick, Brophy, Brigham and Bourne. Some of the towns mentioned were Haverstraw, Peekskill, Ulster, Newburgh and Kingston. It would seem if your ancestor worked in a brick factory, it was probably in the Hudson River Valley.