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Karen Norwillo
17-06-08, 17:39
Does anyone know if these can be frozen? I would like to try my hand at making them. I have them in Finland and love them, but I would like to be able to freeze some. I've not been able to find them in PA anywhere. I have Beatrice Ojakangas' Finnish Cookbook with the recipes for various varieties.

pleppanen
17-06-08, 17:44
I make them with rice and they freeze very well.

Karen Norwillo
17-06-08, 17:57
Thank you. The riisi variety with egg butter are my favorite.

kivinen1
17-06-08, 21:47
Thank you. The riisi variety with egg butter are my favorite.

Karen, I'm sure you weren't going to do this, but just to be sure, don't make them with the egg butter and then freeze.

Only put egg butter on when your going to eat them.

June Pelo
17-06-08, 22:29
My relatives in Nivala always made these for me when I visited them. They thought I was too skinny so they loaded the table with too much of everything. Once they thought they'd surprise me by serving blood bread - but I fooled them because I knew what it was - we grew up eating it as kids at home. Back in those days we could get a bucket of fresh blood from the butcher and make our own bread. I know it sounds awful, but it's actually almost tasteless.

kivinen1
17-06-08, 23:04
My relatives in Nivala always made these for me when I visited them. They thought I was too skinny so they loaded the table with too much of everything. Once they thought they'd surprise me by serving blood bread - but I fooled them because I knew what it was - we grew up eating it as kids at home. Back in those days we could get a bucket of fresh blood from the butcher and make our own bread. I know it sounds awful, but it's actually almost tasteless.
Oh the memories...

On my very first trip to Finland in '72, my cousins neighbor had just butchered a cow. We got to have fresh blodbröd several different ways.

I really don't like it, but the most palatable way to eat it was drying it, and then when ready to eat it, slice it into palm sized (scabs) and put them into a broth. This made them a bit thicker and juicier, and you could season it to mask the liver like flavor with white pepper and salt.

June Pelo
18-06-08, 02:28
Among our family and relatives the bread was baked, sliced and dried. We usually had it for Sat. supper when it was cooked in milk with fried salt pork cubes and potatoes. The pork gave it a tasty flavor. When my father was still living, relatives in Finland used to send him a packet of the dried bread so he could have a taste of the "old country." Wonder what the customs officials thought when they saw it?? My father called it kamstekt - I'm guessing as I don't know how it is spelled. It was considered peasant food.

Hasse
18-06-08, 08:20
Among our family and relatives the bread was baked, sliced and dried. We usually had it for Sat. supper when it was cooked in milk with fried salt pork cubes and potatoes. The pork gave it a tasty flavor. When my father was still living, relatives in Finland used to send him a packet of the dried bread so he could have a taste of the "old country." Wonder what the customs officials thought when they saw it?? My father called it kamstekt - I'm guessing as I don't know how it is spelled. It was considered peasant food."Stek" or in dialect "steitse" as it was called back home in Kronoby was indeed made of blood bread. Quite tasteful as far as I can recall.

I had one link in my collection that you might like to visit. The page describes what kind of meals typically could be served in old ages.
päärona me pikkalakan
"steitse" ie. " Stetse – Var i början av seklet en vanlig maträtt för morgonmålet i många bondehem. Man skar blodbröd i tärningar(=blood bread into cubes), kokade dem i vatten (cooked in water), stekte fläsktärningar (animal fat in cubes, f.ex. pork), tillsatte dessa jämte fläskspadet i koket, saltade o fick närande o smaklig rätt som åts med smörgås och fil eller mjölk (eaten with bread, fil or milk)."
Betapärona
Mutti
..The referenced page can be found here (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=101). It is in Swedish. Interesting pages on the same site include
Traditioner i Finland/Sverige (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=48) (traditions)
(http://paulaz.se/?page_id=48)
Finsk bastu SAUNA (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=99) (the Sauna)
Finsk litteratur (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=100) (Literature)
Mattraditioner i finlandssvenska trakter (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=101) (food traditions)
Nödmat i Finland (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=102) (food during times of famine)
Jämförelse - Finsk o svensk mentalitet (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=103) (mentality)
Folkligt kosthåll i Finland (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=168) (general food&drink traditions in Finland)
Finsk julmat (http://paulaz.se/?page_id=471) (Christmas food)The big problem here is how to translate many of these dialectal words and old definitions into English. I can fully understand that it can be hard to understand the Swedish texts and words.

Merja
18-06-08, 13:13
Hi,
Karelian pies freeze very well. Here in Finland you can also buy them frozen and unbaked, then bake them yourself. Great for us who are not handy with making them ourselves.
Merja

June Pelo
18-06-08, 17:05
Hasse, That's right. I remember my father called it kamsteitse. I think it was mainly eaten in the rural areas because relatives in the big cities said they never ate it. My older relatives still eat it, but I guess the younger generation doesn't care for it - or lutfisk.