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June Pelo
24-11-08, 01:10
http://home.aristotle.net/Thanksgiving/trivia.asp


I got 10 - evidently I don't know much about turkeys. :(

flicka
24-11-08, 07:54
Hi June
Don't feel bad I got 7 right

Karen Norwillo
24-11-08, 15:32
I only got 9, but I didn't answer 2 because I couldn't even guess. Karen

kivinen1
24-11-08, 22:40
I got 12 correct. Not too bad, I quess?

sune
25-11-08, 09:01
I got nine correct. Not bad considering I haven't grown up in a turkey culture. (we eat ham at christmas in Finland). And I guessed most of the answers.

Happy Holidays
Sune

kivinen1
25-11-08, 19:40
I got nine correct. Not bad considering I haven't grown up in a turkey culture. (we eat ham at christmas in Finland). And I guessed most of the answers.

Happy Holidays
Sune

Sune,

Funny you should say this.

I don't ever remember seeing Turkey in Finland until maybe the 1990's(?) at least my family never had it that I had seen, and I never saw it in the store.

I remember when my cousin's came to the states and they ate turkey sandwiches, I asked them if they knew what a turkey looked like, and said they did.

I can't imagine eating a bird that ugly if I had not grown up eating it. To me, it would be like going to Africa and eating some odd bush meat.

SusanR
26-11-08, 18:21
Well, I don't eat turkey and it shows - 9 out of 20.

Jaska Sarell
26-11-08, 20:22
Pure guessing would result in 20*1/4 = 5 correct answers.
I had to guess all and got 6 right, which is well within error margin :cool:

:) Jaska

June Pelo
26-11-08, 22:12
I guess the history of the turkey doesn't matter much to me - I'll be eating lots of it tomorrow and later will be having some turkey sandwiches with dressing and cranberry sauce piled on top - yum... :)

flicka
27-11-08, 06:32
Turkey day is almost here. Am cooking 23 pounder for our crew. A wild-rice dressing. Oh -and cranberry salad
Everbody have a great Holiday

kivinen1
27-11-08, 07:13
I'm chopping up the root vegetables as I type.

Finnish potatoes, turnips, leeks, shallots, fennel root, garlic and parsnips... I'm going to toss them all together and smother them in balsamic vinegar with a bit of sugar and pepper.

Once they're through roasting, I'll uncover the pan and add finely chopped bacon to the top and continue baking until the bacon is crisp.:D

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

Hasse
27-11-08, 08:36
"You got 9 questions right."

Lots of "holes" in my education here. Most of the answers were more or less wild guesses.

RuneM
27-11-08, 20:05
Sune,

Funny you should say this.

I don't ever remember seeing Turkey in Finland until maybe the 1990's(?) at least my family never had it that I had seen, and I never saw it in the store.

I remember when my cousin's came to the states and they ate turkey sandwiches, I asked them if they knew what a turkey looked like, and said they did.

I can't imagine eating a bird that ugly if I had not grown up eating it. To me, it would be like going to Africa and eating some odd bush meat.

Yes, they had turkeys in Finland! (but no thanksgiving day)
Enclosed photo is taken in the beginning of 1930 in Nagu, Finland.
It is my mother (1925-2006) with hens, geese and turkey.

kivinen1
27-11-08, 20:20
Nice photo. Thank you for posting it.:)

June Pelo
28-11-08, 00:30
For many years I've had Thanksgiving dinner with long-time friends in Venice, FL. They usually have 15-20 people and we each take something to put on the table. Alf, a Norwegian, always prepares the turkey. Today we got into a discussion about lutefisk - most of them had never eaten it and I explained how it was dried, soaked and then cooked. They turned up their noses at the thought of eating it. So I didn't win any converts. The Norwegians told us they don't put white sauce on their fish and potatoes - they use melted butter. Quite a lively discussion and a lot of fun was had by all. :)

kivinen1
29-11-08, 01:34
They may not admit to knowing about lutefisk, but the Norwegians have something even more horrid. I tried it once, and thought I'd die; some sort of fish buried in the earth with I don't know what, and left to kind of rot. At least that is the way it smelled.:eek:

June Pelo
29-11-08, 01:58
The Swedes evidently eat something rotten, too. I once knew a Swedish sailor named Gunnar and he told me he was on a ship that had cans of fish that had rotted and the cans were bulging. But they opened them and ate the stinking fish anyway.. :(

June Pelo
29-11-08, 02:03
It seems that centuries ago many Norwegians came to Ireland to escape the bitterness of the Norwegian winter. Ireland was having a famine at the time and food was scarce.

The Norwegians were eating almost all of the fish caught in the ocean, leaving the Irish with nothing but potatoes.

St. Patrick, taking matters into onto his own hands, like most Irishman, decided all the Norwegians had to go. Secretly he organized the IRATION (Irish Republican Army to Rid Ireland of Norwegians). Irish members of the IRATION sabotaged all the power plants in hopes the fish in Norwegian refrigerators would spoil, forcing the Norwegians to a cooler climate where their fish would keep. The fish spoiled all right, but the Norwegians, as everyone knows to this day, thrive on spoiled fish. Faced with failure, the Irishmen sneaked into the Norwegian fish storage caves in the dead of the night and sprinkled the rotten fish with lye, hoping to poison the Norwegian intruders, but as everybody knows, this is how lutefisk was introduced to the Norwegians, and how they thrived on the lye soaked smelly fish.

Matters became even worse for the Irish when the Norwegians started taking over the Irish potato crop to make lefse. Poor St. Patrick was at his wits end. Finally, on March 17, he blew his top and told the Norwegians to "go to hell" -- and it worked, because all the Norwegians left Ireland and went to Minnesota.

Hasse
29-11-08, 11:41
They may not admit to knowing about lutefisk, but the Norwegians have something even more horrid. I tried it once, and thought I'd die; some sort of fish buried in the earth with I don't know what, and left to kind of rot. At least that is the way it smelled.:eek:
You definitely mean the "rakfisk". I had it once in Oslo years ago. Our hosts wanted to serve the best but it may not have been a success. The only one who ate everything was (surise, surprise) married to a Norwegian. - Btw - not even akvavit or snaps did make it easier to keep the rakfisk going down.

Not my favourite Norwegian dish

sune
29-11-08, 22:40
Rakfisk or rakørret is a rotten or fermented trout. I haven't had the "pleasure" but one must be grateful for small things also.

And June is right about the Swedish fish. it's surströmming (sour herring) a fermented Baltic herring. The same dish that gave the surname to Erik Ångerman Sursill whom many of us have descended from. Erik sold his fish to the Swedish crown and it wasn't much appreciated in Stockholm. have tried it and i don't recommend it for totallers. I requires al lot of vodka. I don't like lutfish either, but it's a gourme dish compared to surströmming.

Fermentation is probably one of the oldest ways of making "preserves". Who hasn't heard of Chinese "rotten" eggs?

An aquaintance who participated in a couple of expeditions to Greenland, told me that the Inuits fill a walrus with razorbills, bury it in the ground for several month, after which they dig it up and eat the rotten birds with delight.

In Pedersöre there is a place called Sursik i.e. sour whitefish, which indicates that other fish besides herring have in one time been preserved by letting it rot.

Sune

flicka
01-12-08, 23:04
June, I had lefse also on Thanksgiving. Do you get to have this often if not maybe I send you some home. Darn it was good. Lots of butter and rasberry jam on mine. I just bought lefse stick from someone who makes them out of birch.

June Pelo
02-12-08, 01:05
Hi Lori,

No, I have to confess that I haven't had lefse for a few years. My Norwegian friend Valborg used to make it for me, but she's too old and crippled. Now we just talk about "the good old days." I'd be pleased to taste it again! :)