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Carolyn Nelson
13-07-10, 02:23
Does anyone have a recipe to make the sweet rolls called "grisar" that can be purchased in markets in Jakobstad? I know someone here who loves them and they are quite unique. They have sugar on the outside and a filling of apples and cinnamon. Last year I tried to find them further south from Ostrobothnia and ended up with something similar but not the right thing.

June Pelo
13-07-10, 15:56
Carolyn,

I didn't realize you had also posted a request for the recipe - so I posted one, too. Maybe someone will have it.... :)

Hasse
13-07-10, 21:57
Grisar and Jakobstad....

Now you have understood the whole thing wrong. Grisar is connected to Kronoby and Snåres Bageri. No doubt about that. Sorry Jakobstad!

See the Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=wall&gid=22053645488) page

Hasse

June Pelo
13-07-10, 22:01
I wrote to Carolyn that our cousin in Storby drove to Kronoby every morning to buy grisar for our breakfast. When he told the baker it was for his American cousins, the baker gave him some extra for us! :)

goldie
13-07-10, 23:48
This may be a long shot, but has anyone looked in Beatrice Ojakangas's cookbooks to see if there is a recipe in them? I know she is huge when it comes to Finnish and Swedish baking and cooking.

June Pelo
13-07-10, 23:59
I looked through all my Swedish cookbooks, but didn't find a recipe, although it may be there under a different name. Grisar refers to pigs - the buns are sort of shaped like a pig. I found something similar that I sent to Carolyn.

Hasse
14-07-10, 07:39
The recipe to the Snåres grisar is secret, thus not to be found anywhere on-line or off-line. However grisar is prepared the same way, ie. fried in oil, as our doughnuts but shaped as thin pigs and filled with raspberry jam.

Next time in Finland - consider a trip to Snåres Café in Kronoby. Not really a Camino de Santiago de Compostela pilgrimage but almost...

Hasse

kivinen1
14-07-10, 08:34
Absolut!

The best in the land! Snåres grisar, that is.

I remember Bjarne so well. Now I forget his wife's name; was it Greta?

karinh
14-07-10, 15:10
On Friday I am flying to Kronoby on my way to Terjärv and Högnabba. I´m going to stay there for two weeks. We will stop at Snåres and buy some "grisar". I totally agree that they are special.
karinh

Carolyn Nelson
15-07-10, 07:52
Thanks to all who replied. I am anxious to come to Snåre's and might contact some of you to meet me there. I will be staying in Kallby Aug. 15 or so until Sept. 14 or so. :-)

Ruokoja
15-07-10, 12:10
I would have a recipe of home-made possumunkki.

kivinen1
15-07-10, 12:14
Yes, same thing... ok Ruokoja, let's have it. ;)

Ruokoja
15-07-10, 12:18
Yes, same thing... ok Ruokoja, let's have it. ;)

I have had too many munkkipossus in a form or another. For me only salad ;)

June Pelo
15-07-10, 20:42
Could this recipe be similar to the recipe for grisar?

1 cup whole milk
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
2 tablespoons warm water
3 1/2 to 3 3/4 cups all-purpose flour plus additional for dusting
About 10 cups vegetable oil
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup raspberry, strawberry, or apricot jam
Confectioners sugar for dusting


Bring milk to a simmer in a 1-quart heavy saucepan, then remove from heat and stir in granulated sugar and salt. Cool milk to lukewarm (about 90°F).

While milk is cooling, dissolve yeast in warm water in a small bowl, stirring until creamy, then let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. (If yeast doesn't foam, discard and start over with fresh yeast.)

Pour milk mixture into a large bowl and stir in 2 1/2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons oil, eggs, and yeast mixture with a wooden spoon to make a very soft dough. Spread 1 cup flour on work surface and put dough on top, scraping it from bowl with a rubber spatula. Knead dough, incorporating all of flour from work surface and adding just enough additional flour (if necessary) to keep dough from sticking, until smooth and elastic, 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer dough to another large bowl and sprinkle lightly with additional flour, then cover bowl with a clean kitchen towel and let dough rise in a warm draft-free place until doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours.

Turn out dough onto a floured surface and roll out with a floured rolling pin until 1/2 inch thick. Cut out rounds with 2-inch cutter. Stretch 1 round to 2 1/2 inches and put 1 teaspoon jam in center, then stretch another round to 2 1/2 inches and use it to cover jam, pinching edges of rounds firmly together. (Pinching will stretch doughnuts to about 3 inches in diameter.) Make more jelly doughnuts in same manner.

Cut through filled doughnuts with floured 2 1/2-inch cutter, rotating cutter several times to help seal edges. Transfer rounds to a floured kitchen towel, then reroll scraps (only once) and make more jelly doughnuts in same manner. (If dough shrinks after rerolling, let stand 10 minutes.) Cover doughnuts with another kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place 30 minutes.

While doughnuts rise, heat 3 inches oil (about 10 cups) in a deep 4-quart pot until it registers 375°F on thermometer. Fry doughnuts 2 at a time, turning occasionally, until puffed and golden brown, about 2 minutes per batch. (Doughnuts will bob in oil; hold them half submerged with a slotted spoon to brown evenly.) Transfer as cooked to paper towels to drain. Serve warm, dusted with confectioners sugar.

Ruokoja
15-07-10, 21:37
June,

yes, sounds like the right dough.

kivinen1
16-07-10, 08:36
But, of course, it would taste even better fried in lard.

June Pelo
16-07-10, 17:27
Watched a chef on TV who was fixing southern fried chicken and he used Crisco - said it was best for frying. My mouth waters just to think about that panful of chicken. The best fried chicken I ever ate was in a small country cafe in the Maryland countryside - so crisp and crunchy - yum. :)

sune
19-07-10, 14:49
Hasse:

Long time no write.

Snåre's grisar are ok, but the best were made by Lönngren's in Fäboda in Jakobstad. They had a café by the road from the sand beach into town. That café operated from the late 1920ies to the late 1990ies. Sadly the café is not in operation any more. The Lönngren family had a well reputed bakery in town and sold these grisar to the summer guests in Fäboda during three generations. During the last two decades the original bakery in town had ended, but Airi Lönngren baked every day at the café in Fäboda during the summers.

Sorry, but i couldn't resist a little dispute about taste.

Sune

June Pelo
19-07-10, 15:56
I have visited my relatives in Fäboda, but they have never served grisar, so I missed out. I'm sure they all taste good - no matter who makes them. :)

kivinen1
20-07-10, 09:11
The best grisar is the one you don't have to make yourself.

I also noticed early on that something as simple as toasted bread can taste like heaven at a friend's house, but not so great at home.

sune
21-07-10, 08:00
Kivinen

No wonder my wife's cooking tastes better than my own:D

Sune

Carolyn Nelson
20-08-10, 12:36
I am staying in Kållby now and want to go to Snåres for grisar. Anyone want to meet me there? Please send me private message so I see it on my email. Carolyn Nelson clnelson7*yahoo.com

Carolyn Nelson
06-09-10, 19:44
I am in Finland now. Have been to Snåres with Hasse and Helena Andtbacka. Grisar were "on the house" and fresh out of the oven. Delicious! My cousin on Bredarholmvägen, Ulla-Maj Hagvik, showed me how to make them. They were also delicious and I will share with cohorts when I go home. However I need to find out where to get the "marmalade" they use inside. I don't we have it in the US.;)


The recipe to the Snåres grisar is secret, thus not to be found anywhere on-line or off-line. However grisar is prepared the same way, ie. fried in oil, as our doughnuts but shaped as thin pigs and filled with raspberry jam.

Next time in Finland - consider a trip to Snåres Café in Kronoby. Not really a Camino de Santiago de Compostela pilgrimage but almost...

Hasse

June Pelo
06-09-10, 21:20
The marmalade probably was raspberry jam - they use it in everything.

Carolyn Nelson
06-09-10, 22:51
When we made the grisar the hallon marmalade we used was much thicker than our raspberry jam in US. I bought tins of hallon and apple to bring home. Maybe can figure out how to make thicker jam.

June Pelo
06-09-10, 23:34
I think making jam with pectin makes it gel better. I have some orange marmalade and raspberry jam made by Publix and both are so thick, I need to use a spoon to get it out of the jar.

kivinen1
07-09-10, 05:09
When we made the grisar the hallon marmalade we used was much thicker than our raspberry jam in US. I bought tins of hallon and apple to bring home. Maybe can figure out how to make thicker jam.

Maybe just get some hallon preserves at the IKEA in Renton - their own brand name of knäckebröd is made in Finland,

Good excuse for a day trip.

Carolyn Nelson
07-09-10, 15:29
I will have to try that.... maybe their preserves are thicker than our typical jam.

Carolyn Nelson
07-09-10, 15:30
Thanks that is what I need! is that something you can buy in a normal grocery store?




I think making jam with pectin makes it gel better. I have some orange marmalade and raspberry jam made by Publix and both are so thick, I need to use a spoon to get it out of the jar.

June Pelo
07-09-10, 15:44
Yes, I've bought it at the supermarket - comes in powder or liquid form in a little packet. You may have to ask where to find it.

June Pelo
07-09-10, 15:48
I forgot to include this about Pectin:
http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF8/887.html

Carolyn Nelson
07-09-10, 18:09
I am frustrated with this site... I had a reply all made and then it said the server was too busy and I think I lost what I had. Anyway good info about pectin but what was that stuff made by Publix that you mentioned? I will use what I bought here and then experiment with making jam thicker... maybe that means using Pectin which I don't know if it is the same as the Certo that we use.

June Pelo
07-09-10, 20:01
Yes, Certo sells pectin under their name Certo. And they also usually have recipes in the package. You can also find recipes online. Here in Florida many people make jam and preserves out of all the fruit that grows here, so there is a lot of canning going on. I used to use my papaya, pineapple, grapefruit and oranges and make jam, etc. with them. Jam can be made without pectin, which appears naturally in most fruit. But using pectin speeds it up and also makes sure that your jam will jell. The product I bought from Publix was ready-made raspberry jam. They make their own jams and preserves and sell them. I don't know why, but their products are thicker than other well-known brand names. As I said, I have to use a spoon to get their jam out of the jar.

Carolyn Nelson
20-09-11, 23:01
I was the original person who requested... sorry I just saw this. I have emailed my cousin who taught me how to make grisar to see if it is the same. I am in Finland now so can't look at my own copy.