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Hiltm
26-02-11, 23:28
Greetings all,

I'm new to this forum with with Pyykkönen/Tauriainen/Mulari ancestry from Suomussalmi and Simonen/Horsma/Räisänen ancestry from Pudasjärvi. I hope to find distant relatives and assistance with my work.

My gg grandfather is:

ERKKI PYYKKÖNEN (LAURI, LAURI, ANTTI, HEIKKI, JAAKKO)
b. 24 Sep 1859 at Kerälä 17, Pieni Losovaara, Suomussalmi, Oulu, Finland
m. BRIITA KRAYLEN SIMONEN 2 Mar 1883 in Delaware, Grant Twp., Houghton, Michigan, daughter of JOOSEPPI SIMONEN and MAGDALENA HORSMA. He emigrated to the US in 1880.
d. 11 Mar 1950 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon.

I've been very successful using HISKI from SSHY to find extensive records for the Pyykkönens of Paltamo and Suomussalmi. I have also found great records for the Simonen and Horsma lines in Pudasjärvi.

I am interested in three areas:
1) I need some help with Finnish translations for various farm names: I'd really like to know more about them. For example, I think 'Kettula' means 'Fox Farm', correct? 'Pieni Losovaara' means 'Little (?) Risk' ?
2) I'd like to know more about exactly where these people lived. I've seen other reesearchers' maps of farms which appear a lot like what we in the US would call plat maps. They contain enough detail to determine their positions in relation to a village or lake.
3) Can anyone recommend a site or organization that might have emigration records as early as 1880/1882 - the Finnish Migration Project site yeilded nothing.

Looking forward to any responses, thanks.

Michael Hilt
Washington, USA

Matti
24-07-11, 13:31
1) I need some help with Finnish translations for various farm names: I'd really like to know more about them. For example, I think 'Kettula' means 'Fox Farm', correct? 'Pieni Losovaara' means 'Little (?) Risk' ?

Hi Michael,

One important correction for you: The word vaara in geographical terms means a hill, eg. in Naapurinvaara or Vuokatinvaara in Sotkamo:

http://www.vuokatti.fi/fi/tekemiset/nahtavyydet/naapurinvaara/

There are no mountains in Finland. The highest hills are situated in northernmost Lapland and are called tunturi. The second highest hills are usually in Kainuu region (eg. Suomussalmi) and they are called vaara. The word mäki means a lower hill, they are common also in southern Finland.

I don't know if there is such a ranking in your language (mountain, hill, etc.)

Best regards,

Matti

Hasse
24-07-11, 13:54
1) ...The highest hills are situated in northernmost Lapland and are called tunturi. The second highest hills are usually in Kainuu region (eg. Suomussalmi) and they are called vaara. The word mäki means a lower hill, they are common also in southern Finland...

Forgive me, but way back in school I was taught that the difference between "tunturi" and "vaara" was the so called "treeline", ie. if the hill was "bald" or not. Of course this mostly correlates with height and even locality, but that was the definition back then. Or does my memory play me a trick?

Matti
24-07-11, 14:13
Yes, thanks Hasse, the treeline is a perfect distinction. And the highest ones are bald just because they are so high, and in Finland they only exist in Lapland and Kuusamo.

Also the Norwegian mountains, and perhaps the Swedish ones too, are called tunturi in Finnish. And we shouldn't forget the Alaskan tunturit which this famous American-Finnish song tells about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P59U0jFMxxo

Hiltm
25-07-11, 04:15
Matti, Thanks for the response! So Pieni Losovaara, in English, is Little Loso Hill?
Michael