PDA

View Full Version : Pascha Bread



Sandy Witt
03-03-04, 01:44
While visiting Finland last June, my second cousin Torolf Bäckman gave me a Pascha Bread mold/form that he had made out of wood. He promised to send me the recipe before Easter, but hasn't sent it yet. I have not been able fo find a recipe on the Internet.

I would like to bake this for Easter. Does anyone have a recipe?

Sandy Johnson Witt
Gainesville, Florida

kpaavola
03-03-04, 01:55
Sandy, I found this by searching on Google.com:

Message 1 of 1 Subject 1 of 1
Subject: Re: Looking for Pascha bread recipe....
Date: 4/17/2001 9:39 AM Eastern Standard Time
From: GFA Terry
MsgId: <20010417103934.16062.00000962%40ng-fo1.aol.com>



Pascha (Also called Easter Sweet Bread)

1 lb. sweet cream butter
7 egg yolks
2 c. sugar
2 lbs. cottage cheese (small curd-put through strainer with small holes)
1/2 pt. whipping cream
1 tsp. vanilla
1/2 lb. white raisins
1/2 c. chopped pecans
1/2 jar red cherries, cut up
1 med. can crushed pineapple, drained

Beat together egg yolks and sugar and add to sweet cream butter. Fold in strained cottage cheese. Whip and fold in whipped cream. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Add 1/2 pound raisins, 1/2 cup pecans, and 1/2 jar cut up red cherries. Fold in crushed pineapple. Place cheese mixture into 6 x 5 flower pot lined with cheesecloth. Place a saucer on top of the cheese with a brick or something heavy on top of saucer to press down cheese. Put the pot into a
pan or plastic basin to catch any liquid which will drain. Pour out each day. Keep refrigerated for 3 days. Can be frozen.

Sandy Witt
03-03-04, 02:27
Thanks, Kevin,

I will try this although it looks a bit more complicated than my usual recipes ;-/

It is good I am not on the Atkins Diet.

Sandy

kpaavola
03-03-04, 02:40
This sounds much easier and more like "bread"....

Don't what it's really supposed to be but try this one.

Sweet Easter Bread (Tsourekia)
Ingredients:
3 packages (or 2ozs. of fresh yeast) yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1 c milk
10-11 c flour
7 cups eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup (melted) butter
1 tablespoon powdered anise seeds
lemon rind

Procedure:
Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add milk, 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 cups of flour. Stir batter, cover and set in a warm place for about 1 hour.
Beat 6 eggs, sugar and lemon rind over hot water.
Stir mixture into batter. Add remaining flour.
Put dough on gloured pastry board and knead, adding the butter, until smooth and elastic.
Place in a large buttered bowl and brush surface lightly with melted butter.
Cover with a cloth and let it rise in a warm place until it has doubled its size, about 2 hours.
Shape dough into long ropes 3/4 to 1 inch diameter and cut into 12 inch lengths.
Braid together loosely 3 ropes on a greased baking sheet.
Let it rise, covered, until doubled-about 1 hour. Brush with beaten egg and bake in moderate oven 25 to 30 minutes.
Note: You may also press into the braids one or more dyed eggs. In addition, you may also sprinkle the breads with sesame seeds and/or shredded almonds.

http://www.prosphora.org/page18.html

Sandy Witt
03-03-04, 03:28
Kevin,

You are right.

I appreciate this option AND the website with many more alternatives.

Just out of curiosity, have you heard of this type of bread before?

Sandy

kpaavola
03-03-04, 05:03
Hi Sandy,
Yes, I've seen the braided breads with the colored Easter (hard boiled) eggs in them. I don't remember the taste of the bread though, meaning was it sweet like pulla or just like regular bread.

Some of those recipes were "interesting". ;)

Sandy Witt
03-03-04, 18:39
Thanks, Kevin,

I have printed the recipe and plan to give it a try.

Sandy

Nyberg Ernst
04-03-04, 21:18
Originally posted by Sandy Witt
Thanks, Kevin,

I have printed the recipe and plan to give it a try.

Sandy

About Pasha

Pasha belongs to the orthodox Easter in Russia. It is more of a dessert than some kind of bread. It is made in a wooden form, often decorated with the characters XB for "Xpuctoc Bockpese", Christus recurred. There are many "right" reciepes, but in any case the ingredients should comprise curd (cottage) cheese (in Swedish "kvarg" and i Finnish "rahka"), egg, butter, cream, smetana (sour cream), vanilla. The first reciepe by kpaavola is close to the reciepe I use, but the reciepe with yeast has nothing to do with pasha.

Good Luck!

Sandy Witt
04-03-04, 21:47
Ernst,

Thank you for this information. I had no idea that it was more like a dessert-type bread, which would explain the ingredients listed in the first recipe. And -- as you indicated in your posting - the letters "X" and "B" are carved into the wood. I didn't know what they meant before you wrote me.

Please let me know if there are any important changes that should be made in the first recipe. Otherwise, I will try it as it is.

Sandy

(in the 85-degree Florida heat - 29.444... degrees Celsius)

sune
05-03-04, 15:02
Originally posted by Sandy Witt
Ernst,
I had no idea that it was more like a dessert-type bread...

One more correction, if you don't mind. Pasha is not a bread at all. It is a dessert. Just follow the recipe Kevin wrote and yo will be okay.

My mother-in-law, who is from Carelia, though not Greek Orthodox made a most wonderful pasha every easter as long as she had her own household.

We always put a layer of the pasha on slices of sweet wheat bread and had coffee on the side.

Sune

Sandy Witt
06-03-04, 03:41
Thank you, Sune,

I don't know why I thought it was a type of bread. I will try to find a photo on the Internet.

So it is spelled "pasha" (and not "pascha").

I appreciate the helpful responses from all three of you! And I have plenty of time to prepare for this by Easter.

Sandy

sune
08-03-04, 10:00
Originally posted by Sandy Witt
So it is spelled "pasha" (and not "pascha").


I am not certain about the spelling. In Finnish it is pasha, because the "sch” form is not used in Finnish. In any case it is a transciption from Russian, and I don't know the rules on how to transcribe Russian to Finnish, Swedish och English. Perhaps Cooper is more familiar with that.

Sune

Nyberg Ernst
10-03-04, 13:29
Originally posted by Sandy Witt
Ernst,

Thank you for this information. I had no idea that it was more like a dessert-type bread, which would explain the ingredients listed in the first recipe. And -- as you indicated in your posting - the letters "X" and "B" are carved into the wood. I didn't know what they meant before you wrote me.

Please let me know if there are any important changes that should be made in the first recipe. Otherwise, I will try it as it is.

Sandy

(in the 85-degree Florida heat - 29.444... degrees Celsius)

Nyberg Ernst
10-03-04, 13:59
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Sandy Witt
[B]Ernst,

Please let me know if there are any important changes that should be made in the first recipe....

Sandy

I prefer to submit my own recipe that I have used for 25 years. This is my cecond effort. The first message "went" avay without text.

2 decilitre melt butter
1...1,5 decilitre sugar
250 gram cottage cheese
1 egg yolk
2 decilitre whipping cream
30 millilitre (two tablespoon) vanilla sugar
45 millilitre (three tablespoon) chopped almonds
1 decilitre raisins
30 millilitre lemon juice

Cool down the melt butter until it congeals. Add the sugar and beat spongy. Add all other ingredients except the cream and mix carefully. Whip and fold in the cream.
I have not a wooden form, so I use a strainer, lined with some clothe (I use thin cloth used for surgical dressing). I keep the strainer in a basin in the refrigerator for 24 hours - without "something heavy on top".

A wooden form should be soaked in water for some hours before it is used. Also this form should be lined with cloth in order to get the pasha loose.

Good luck! The result depends wery much on the "cottage cheese". I do not know whether the stuff you get in your markets is the same as here.

Kind regards
Ernst

Sandy Witt
10-03-04, 15:38
Tack så mycket, Ernst, for submitting your personal recipe. And I appreciate the conversion to tablespoons.

I can obtain all of these ingredients (except the cheese or surgical cloth) at my local grocery store.

I wonder if it would be better to use a collander to hold the pasha preparation in the refrigerator and then place it in the wooden form before serving it. Thanks for the tip about soaking the form before using it; I would not have thought of doing that. I am not sure if the cottage cheese we have here is the same as the Scandinavian cottage cheese (I usually buy low-fat cottage cheese but will buy the regular type for pasha).

Best regards,
Sandy